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Preference measurement using conjoint methods: an empirical investigation of reliability

  • Stirling Bryan

    (Health Economics Facility, University of Birmingham, UK)

  • Lisa Gold

    (Health Economics Facility, University of Birmingham, UK)

  • Rob Sheldon

    (Accent Marketing and Research, London, UK)

  • Martin Buxton

    (Health Economics Research Group, Brunel University, UK)

Registered author(s):

    The application of conjoint measurement to the field of health economics is relatively new, although there is growing interest and there have been a number of studies undertaken recently. Wider acceptance of the technique requires methodological issues concerning both reliability and validity to be addressed. This paper reports an empirical investigation of the test-retest reliability of the discrete choice conjoint measurement approach in health care. This investigation of conjoint reliability was framed using the clinical context of investigation and treatment of knee injuries. A high level of reliability at both the input data and results levels was demonstrated. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 385-395

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:9:y:2000:i:5:p:385-395
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    1. Vick, Sandra & Scott, Anthony, 1998. "Agency in health care. Examining patients' preferences for attributes of the doctor-patient relationship," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 587-605, October.
    2. Stirling Bryan & Martin Buxton & Robert Sheldon & Alison Grant, 1998. "Magnetic resonance imaging for the investigation of knee injuries: an investigation of preferences," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(7), pages 595-603.
    3. Mandy Ryan & Jenny Hughes, 1997. "Using Conjoint Analysis to Assess Women's Preferences for Miscarriage Management," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(3), pages 261-273.
    4. Alan Shiell & Penelope Hawe & Janelle Seymour, 1997. "Values and preferences are not necessarily the same," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(5), pages 515-518.
    5. Magat, Wesley A. & Kip Viscusi, W. & Huber, Joel, 1988. "Paired comparison and contingent valuation approaches to morbidity risk valuation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 395-411, December.
    6. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
    7. Green, Paul E & Srinivasan, V, 1978. " Conjoint Analysis in Consumer Research: Issues and Outlook," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(2), pages 103-23, Se.
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