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Welfare analysis and redistributive policies

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  • Bargain, Olivier

Abstract

Applied welfare analyses of redistributive systems nowadays benefit from powerful tax benefit microsimulation programs combined with administrative data. Arguably, most of the distributional studies of that kind focus on social welfare defined as a function – typically inequality or poverty indices – of household equivalized income. In parallel, economic research has made considerable progress in the measurement of welfare along several dimensions. Distinct but related branches of the literature have attempted (i) to model different behaviour (in a way that matter for incidence and redistribution of tax benefit policies), (ii) to go beyond income, (iii) to better define and estimate equivalence scales, (iv) to open the household black box and measure welfare at the individual level. I suggest a general framework to critically review these streams of literatures and to discuss whether recent advances in each of these fields have been or could be readily operationalized in welfare analyses and policy simulations.

Suggested Citation

  • Bargain, Olivier, 2017. "Welfare analysis and redistributive policies," EUROMOD Working Papers EM16/17, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:emodwp:em16-17
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/euromod/em16-17.pdf
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Welfare Analysis and Redistributive Policies
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-05-17 19:59:29

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