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Christiane Hellmanzik

Personal Details

First Name:Christiane
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hellmanzik
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phe283
http://www.hellmanzik.org

Affiliation

(95%) Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Universität Dortmund

Dortmund, Germany
http://www.wiso.uni-dortmund.de/

: +49 +231 755 3182
+49 +231 755 4375
Vogelpothsweg 87, D-44227 Dortmund
RePEc:edi:wsdorde (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)
Trinity College Dublin

Dublin, Ireland
http://www.tcd.ie/iiis/

: 00 353 1 6083887
00 353 1 6083939
The Sutherland Centre, Level 6, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2
RePEc:edi:cetcdie (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Schmitz, Martin & Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Taking gravity online: the role of virtual proximity in international finance," Working Paper Series 1879, European Central Bank.
  2. Schmitz, Martin & Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2015. "Virtual proximity and audiovisual services trade," Working Paper Series 1826, European Central Bank.
  3. Christiane Hellmanzik, Department of Economics and IIIS, Trinity College Dublin, 2009. "Artistic Clusters and Modern Artists’ Mobility - An Empirical Study," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp296, IIIS.

Articles

  1. Hellmanzik, Christiane & Schmitz, Martin, 2017. "Taking gravity online: The role of virtual proximity in international finance," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 164-179.
  2. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Historic art exhibitions and modern - day auction results," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 421-430.
  3. Christiane Hellmanzik & Martin Schmitz, 2016. "The impact of cultural exceptions: audiovisual services trade and trade policy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(10), pages 695-700, July.
  4. Hellmanzik, Christiane & Schmitz, Martin, 2015. "Virtual proximity and audiovisual services trade," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 82-101.
  5. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2013. "Does travel inspire? Evidence from the superstars of modern art," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 281-303, August.
  6. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2013. "Democracy and economic outcomes: Evidence from the superstars of modern art," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 58-69.
  7. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2010. "Location matters: Estimating cluster premiums for prominent modern artists," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 199-218, February.
  8. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2009. "Artistic styles: revisiting the analysis of modern artists’ careers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(3), pages 201-232, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Schmitz, Martin & Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Taking gravity online: the role of virtual proximity in international finance," Working Paper Series 1879, European Central Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Rogelio Mercado Jr., 2018. "Bilateral Capital Flows: Transaction Patterns and Gravity," Trinity Economics Papers tep0218, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2018.

  2. Schmitz, Martin & Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2015. "Virtual proximity and audiovisual services trade," Working Paper Series 1826, European Central Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Hellmanzik, Christiane & Schmitz, Martin, 2017. "Taking gravity online: The role of virtual proximity in international finance," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 164-179.
    2. Philipp Harms & Daria Shuvalova, 2016. "Cultural Distance and International Trade in Services: A Disaggregate View," Working Papers 1606, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.

Articles

  1. Hellmanzik, Christiane & Schmitz, Martin, 2017. "Taking gravity online: The role of virtual proximity in international finance," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 164-179.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Historic art exhibitions and modern - day auction results," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 421-430.

    Cited by:

    1. Itaya, Jun-ichi & Ursprung, Heinrich W., 2016. "Price and death: modeling the death effect in art price formation," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 431-445.
    2. Federico Etro & Elena Stepanova, 2017. "Art Auctions and Art Investment in the Golden Age of British Painting," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 64(2), pages 191-225, May.
    3. Agnello, Richard J., 2016. "Do U.S. paintings follow the CAPM? Findings disaggregated by subject, artist, and value of the work," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 403-411.
    4. Pownall, Rachel A.J. & Graddy, Kathryn, 2016. "Pricing color intensity and lightness in contemporary art auctions," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 412-420.

  3. Hellmanzik, Christiane & Schmitz, Martin, 2015. "Virtual proximity and audiovisual services trade," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 82-101.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2013. "Does travel inspire? Evidence from the superstars of modern art," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 281-303, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Piva, Mariacristina & Tani, Massimiliano & Vivarelli, Marco, 2017. "The Productivity Impact of Business Mobility: International Evidence," GLO Discussion Paper Series 14, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Mariacristina Piva & Massimiliano Tani & Marco Vivarelli, 2018. "Business visits, knowledge diffusion and productivity," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 1321-1338, October.
    3. Andrej Srakar & Petja Grafenauer & Marilena Vecco, 2016. "Being Central and Productive? Evidence from Slovenian Visual Artists in the 19th and 20th Century," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-09-2016, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Sep 2016.
    4. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Historic art exhibitions and modern - day auction results," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 421-430.
    5. John O’Hagan & Alan Walsh, 2017. "Historical Migration and Geographic Clustering of Prominent Western Philosophers," Homo Oeconomicus: Journal of Behavioral and Institutional Economics, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 11-32, April.
    6. Piva, Mariacristina & Tani, Massimiliano & Vivarelli, Marco, 2017. "Labour mobility through business visits as a way to foster productivity," MERIT Working Papers 004, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Guido Candela & Massimiliano Castellani & Pierpaolo Pattitoni & F. Marta L. Lascio, 2016. "On Rosen’s and Adler’s hypotheses in the modern and contemporary visual art market," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 415-437, August.

  5. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2010. "Location matters: Estimating cluster premiums for prominent modern artists," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 199-218, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Borowiecki, Karol Jan, 2011. "Geographic Clustering and Productivity: An Instrumental Variable Approach for Classical Composers," Annual Conference 2011 (Frankfurt, Main): The Order of the World Economy - Lessons from the Crisis 48738, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Charlie Karlsson, 2011. "Clusters, Networks and Creativity," Chapters,in: Handbook of Creative Cities, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Bayer Thomas & Page John & Raviv Yaron & Rosett Joshua, 2013. "Age, Human Capital, and the Quality of Work: New Evidence from Old Masters," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 687-708, July.
    4. Etro, Federico & Pagani, Laura, 2012. "The Market for Paintings in Italy During the Seventeenth Century," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(02), pages 423-447, June.
    5. Christiane Hellmanzik, Department of Economics and IIIS, Trinity College Dublin, 2009. "Artistic Clusters and Modern Artists’ Mobility - An Empirical Study," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp296, IIIS.
    6. Andrej Srakar & Petja Grafenauer & Marilena Vecco, 2016. "Being Central and Productive? Evidence from Slovenian Visual Artists in the 19th and 20th Century," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-09-2016, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Sep 2016.
    7. John Galbraith & Douglas Hodgson, 2015. "Innovation, experience and artists’ age-valuation profiles: evidence from eighteenth-century rococo and neoclassical painters," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 39(3), pages 259-275, August.
    8. John O’Hagan & Alan Walsh, 2017. "Historical Migration and Geographic Clustering of Prominent Western Philosophers," Homo Oeconomicus: Journal of Behavioral and Institutional Economics, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 11-32, April.
    9. John Galbraith & Douglas James Hodgson, 2009. "Dimension Reduction and Model Averaging for Estimation of Artists' Age-Valuation Profiles," CIRANO Working Papers 2009s-41, CIRANO.
    10. Karol Borowiecki & John O’Hagan, 2013. "Impact of war on individual life-cycle creativity: tentative evidence in relation to composers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 37(3), pages 347-358, August.
    11. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & John W. O'HAGAN, 2011. "War and Individual Creativity: Tentative Evidence in Relation to Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    12. Borowiecki, Karol Jan & Kavetsos, Georgios, 2015. "In fatal pursuit of immortal fame: Peer competition and early mortality of music composers," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 6/2015, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    13. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2013. "Democracy and economic outcomes: Evidence from the superstars of modern art," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 58-69.
    14. Douglas Hodgson, 2011. "Age–price profiles for Canadian painters at auction," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(4), pages 287-308, November.
    15. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2013. "Does travel inspire? Evidence from the superstars of modern art," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 281-303, August.
    16. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & Georgios KAVETSOS, 2011. "Does Competition Kill? The Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1111, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    17. John W. Galbraith & Douglas J. Hodgson, 2018. "Econometric Fine Art Valuation by Combining Hedonic and Repeat-Sales Information," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(3), pages 1-15, June.
    18. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2009. "Artistic styles: revisiting the analysis of modern artists’ careers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(3), pages 201-232, August.
    19. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "War and Creativity: Solving the War-Art Puzzle for Classical Music Composition," Trinity Economics Papers tep0711, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

  6. Christiane Hellmanzik, 2009. "Artistic styles: revisiting the analysis of modern artists’ careers," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(3), pages 201-232, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Bayer Thomas & Page John & Raviv Yaron & Rosett Joshua, 2013. "Age, Human Capital, and the Quality of Work: New Evidence from Old Masters," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 687-708, July.
    2. Francesco Angelini & Massimiliano Castellani, 2017. "Cultural and economic value: A (p)review," Working Paper series 17-10, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Jan 2018.
    3. John Galbraith & Douglas Hodgson, 2015. "Innovation, experience and artists’ age-valuation profiles: evidence from eighteenth-century rococo and neoclassical painters," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 39(3), pages 259-275, August.
    4. Douglas Hodgson, 2011. "Age–price profiles for Canadian painters at auction," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(4), pages 287-308, November.
    5. John W. Galbraith & Douglas J. Hodgson, 2018. "Econometric Fine Art Valuation by Combining Hedonic and Repeat-Sales Information," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(3), pages 1-15, June.
    6. Guido Candela & Massimiliano Castellani & Pierpaolo Pattitoni & F. Marta L. Lascio, 2016. "On Rosen’s and Adler’s hypotheses in the modern and contemporary visual art market," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 415-437, August.
    7. Elena Stepanova, 2017. "The impact of color palettes on the prices of paintings," LEM Papers Series 2017/25, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (2) 2009-08-30 2015-09-18. Author is listed
  2. NEP-IFN: International Finance (1) 2016-02-29. Author is listed
  3. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2015-09-18. Author is listed
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2009-08-30. Author is listed

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