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Pricing color intensity and lightness in contemporary art auctions

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  • Pownall, Rachel A.J.
  • Graddy, Kathryn

Abstract

Color plays an important part in modern life and influences our decision making process. However, little is known about how the different attributes of color, namely intensity and lightness, influence price. By analyzing auction data for paintings we can put a price on these attributes of color. Using a unique set of data for Contemporary artworks of Andy Warhol prints, we are able to observe the influence of intensity and lightness using RGB values as explanatory variables on prices achieved at auction. Controlling for other hedonic characteristics, our empirical results find significant evidence of intense colors fetching a premium over equivalent artworks which are less intense in color. Furthermore, darkness carries a premium over lightness.

Suggested Citation

  • Pownall, Rachel A.J. & Graddy, Kathryn, 2016. "Pricing color intensity and lightness in contemporary art auctions," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 412-420.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:70:y:2016:i:3:p:412-420
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rie.2016.06.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Historic art exhibitions and modern - day auction results," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 421-430.
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    Cited by:

    1. Itaya, Jun-ichi & Ursprung, Heinrich W., 2016. "Price and death: modeling the death effect in art price formation," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 431-445.
    2. repec:spr:empeco:v:56:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1413-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hellmanzik, Christiane, 2016. "Historic art exhibitions and modern - day auction results," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 421-430.
    4. Ma, Marshall (Xiaoyin) & Noussair, Charles & Renneboog, Luc, 2019. "Colors, Emotions, and the Auction Value of Paintings," Discussion Paper 2019-006, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Elena Stepanova, 2019. "The impact of color palettes on the prices of paintings," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 755-773, February.

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    Keywords

    Art Economics; RGB color; Value;

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