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Emanuel Gasteiger

Personal Details

First Name:Emanuel
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gasteiger
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pga551
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://www.urleiwand.com
Wiedner Hauptstraße 8/E105-3 1040 Wien Austria
Terminal Degree:2011 Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre; Fakultät für Wirtschaftswissenschaften; Universität Wien (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Institut für Stochastik und Wirtschaftsmathematik
Technische Universität Wien

Wien, Austria
https://swm.tuwien.ac.at/
RePEc:edi:imtuwat (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Mario Di Serio & Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger & Giovanni Melina, 2022. "The Euro Area Government Spending Multiplier in Demand- and Supply-Driven Recessions," CESifo Working Paper Series 9678, CESifo.
  2. Destefanis, Sergio & Fragetta, Matteo & Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Does one size fit all in the Euro Area? Some counterfactual evidence," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 05/2019, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
  3. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Optimal Constrained Interest-Rate Rules under Heterogeneous Expectations," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 04/2021, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
  4. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2020. "Automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 02/2020, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
  5. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Grimaud, Alex, 2020. "Price setting frequency and the Phillips Curve," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 03/2020, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
  6. Branch, William A. & Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2019. "Endogenously (non-)Ricardian beliefs," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 03/2019, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
  7. Sergio Destefanis & Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2017. "On the Macroeconomic Performance of the Euro Area," Working Papers 4/2017, Interuniversity Research Center "Ezio Tarantelli".
  8. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2017. "A note on automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax," Discussion Papers 2017/17, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
  9. DI SERIO, Mario & FRAGETTA, Matteo & GASTEIGER, Emanuel, 2017. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the United States," CELPE Discussion Papers 150, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
  10. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2017. "On the possibility of automation-induced stagnation," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 07-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
  11. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2014. "Heterogeneous Expectations, Optimal Monetary Policy, and the Merit of Policy Inertia," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100555, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  12. Emanuel Gasteiger, 2013. "Do heterogeneous expectations constitute a challenge for policy interaction?," Working Papers Series 2 13-02, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
  13. Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2012. "Fiscal Foresight, Limited Information and the Effects of Government Spending Shocks," Working Papers Series 2 12-02, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
  14. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2011. "Heterogeneous expectations, Taylor rules and the merit of monetary policy inertia," MPRA Paper 31004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Zhang, Shoujian, 2011. "Anticipation, learning and welfare: the case of distortionary taxation," MPRA Paper 30625, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2022. "Automation, Stagnation, And The Implications Of A Robot Tax," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(1), pages 218-249, January.
  2. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Optimal constrained interest-rate rules under heterogeneous expectations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 287-325.
  3. Mario Di Serio & Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2020. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the United States," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 82(6), pages 1262-1294, December.
  4. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2018. "Do Heterogeneous Expectations Constitute A Challenge For Policy Interaction?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(8), pages 2107-2140, December.
  5. Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2014. "Fiscal Foresight, Limited Information and the Effects of Government Spending Shocks," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(5), pages 667-692, October.
  6. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Zhang, Shoujian, 2014. "Anticipation, learning and welfare: the case of distortionary taxation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 113-126.
  7. Emanuel Gasteiger, 2014. "Heterogeneous Expectations, Optimal Monetary Policy, and the Merit of Policy Inertia," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(7), pages 1535-1554, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2017. "A note on automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax," Discussion Papers 2017/17, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. A note on automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2017-07-19 02:09:49

Working papers

  1. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Optimal Constrained Interest-Rate Rules under Heterogeneous Expectations," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 04/2021, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.

    Cited by:

    1. Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2020. "Fiscal Stimulus In Expectations-Driven Liquidity Traps," Working Papers 0683, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    2. Elton Beqiraj & Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Marco Di Pietro & Carolina Serpieri, 2020. "Bounded rationality and heterogeneous expectations: Euler versus anticipated-utility approach," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 249-273, August.
    3. Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2018. "Fiscal stimulus in an expectation driven liquidity trap," BERG Working Paper Series 138, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    4. Gavin Goy & Cars Homme & Kostas Mavromatis, 2018. "Forward Guidance and the Role of Central Bank Credibility," DNB Working Papers 614, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    5. Hagenhoff, Tim, 2018. "An aggregate welfare optimizing interest rate rule under heterogeneous expectations," BERG Working Paper Series 139, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.

  2. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2020. "Automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 02/2020, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.

    Cited by:

    1. Abeliansky, Ana Lucia & Prettner, Klaus, 2020. "Automation and Demographic Change," GLO Discussion Paper Series 518, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Ana Lucia Abeliansky & Klaus Prettner, 2021. "Population growth and automation density: theory and cross-country evidence," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp315, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    3. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "The lost race against the machine: Automation, education, and inequality in an R&D-based growth model," University of Göttingen Working Papers in Economics 329, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Huang, Xu & Hu, Yan & Dong, Zhiqiang, 2019. "The macroeconomic consequences of artificial intelligence: A theoretical framework," Economics Discussion Papers 2019-48, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    5. Xiaomeng Zhang & Theodore Palivos & Xiangbo Liu, 2022. "Aging and automation in economies with search frictions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 35(2), pages 621-642, April.
    6. Stähler, Nikolai, 2021. "The Impact of Aging and Automation on the Macroeconomy and Inequality," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    7. Sasaki, Hiroaki & Hagiwara, Takefumi & Pham, Huong & Fukatani, Noriki & Ogawa, Shogo & Okahara, Naoto, 2021. "How Does Automation Affect Economic Growth and Income Distribution in a Two-Class Economy?," MPRA Paper 106481, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Sasaki, Hiroaki, 2021. "Automation Technology, Economic Growth, and Income Distribution in an Economy with Dynasties and Overlapping Generations," MPRA Paper 105446, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Orlando Gomes, 2021. "Growth theory under heterogeneous heuristic behavior," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 533-571, April.

  3. Branch, William A. & Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2019. "Endogenously (non-)Ricardian beliefs," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 03/2019, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.

    Cited by:

    1. Elias, Christopher J., 2022. "Adaptive learning with heterogeneous expectations in an estimated medium-scale New Keynesian model," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    2. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Grimaud, Alex, 2020. "Price setting frequency and the Phillips Curve," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 03/2020, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.

  4. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2017. "A note on automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax," Discussion Papers 2017/17, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Lankisch, Clemens & Prettner, Klaus & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2017. "Robots and the skill premium: An automation-based explanation of wage inequality," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 29-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    2. Lankisch, Clemens & Prettner, Klaus & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2019. "How can robots affect wage inequality?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 161-169.
    3. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "The lost race against the machine: Automation, education, and inequality in an R&D-based growth model," University of Göttingen Working Papers in Economics 329, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Huang, Xu & Hu, Yan & Dong, Zhiqiang, 2019. "The macroeconomic consequences of artificial intelligence: A theoretical framework," Economics Discussion Papers 2019-48, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    5. Kerstin Hotte & Angelos Theodorakopoulos & Pantelis Koutroumpis, 2021. "Automation and Taxation," Papers 2103.04111, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2022.
    6. Zhang, Pengqing, 2019. "Automation, wage inequality and implications of a robot tax," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 500-509.
    7. Uwe Thuemmel, 2018. "Optimal Taxation of Robots," CESifo Working Paper Series 7317, CESifo.
    8. Ben Vermeulen & Jan Kesselhut & Andreas Pyka & Pier-Paolo Saviotti, 2018. "The impact of automation on employment: just the usual structural change?," Post-Print hal-02097471, HAL.
    9. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2019. "Innovation, Automation, and Inequality: Policy Challenges in the Race against the Machine," GLO Discussion Paper Series 320, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    10. Cords, Dario & Prettner, Klaus, 2018. "Technological unemployment revisited: Automation in a search and matching framework," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 19-2018, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    11. Martin Labaj & Daniel Dujava, 2019. "Economic growth and convergence during the transition to production using automation capital," Department of Economic Policy Working Paper Series 017, Department of Economic Policy, Faculty of National Economy, University of Economics in Bratislava.
    12. Orlando Gomes, 2021. "Growth theory under heterogeneous heuristic behavior," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 533-571, April.
    13. Geiger, Niels & Prettner, Klaus & Schwarzer, Johannes A., 2018. "Automatisierung, Wachstum und Ungleichheit," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 13-2018, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.

  5. DI SERIO, Mario & FRAGETTA, Matteo & GASTEIGER, Emanuel, 2017. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the United States," CELPE Discussion Papers 150, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.

    Cited by:

    1. Mr. Giovanni Melina & Adalgiso Amendola & Mario di Serio & Matteo Fragetta, 2019. "The Euro-Area Government Spending Multiplier at the Effective Lower Bound," IMF Working Papers 2019/133, International Monetary Fund.
    2. AMENDOLA, Adalgiso & DI SERIO, Mario & FRAGETTA, Matteo, 2018. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the Euro Area," CELPE Discussion Papers 153, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    3. Mr. Giovanni Melina & Mario di Serio & Matteo Fragetta, 2021. "The Impact of r-g on the Euro-Area Government Spending Multiplier," IMF Working Papers 2021/039, International Monetary Fund.

  6. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2017. "On the possibility of automation-induced stagnation," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 07-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.

    Cited by:

    1. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "The lost race against the machine: Automation, education, and inequality in an R&D-based growth model," University of Göttingen Working Papers in Economics 329, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    2. Óscar Afonso & Elena Sochirca & Pedro Cunha Neves, 2022. "Robots and Humans: The Role of Fiscal and Monetary Policies in an Endogenous Growth Model," CEF.UP Working Papers 2201, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    3. Wright, Scott A. & Schultz, Ainslie E., 2018. "The rising tide of artificial intelligence and business automation: Developing an ethical framework," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 61(6), pages 823-832.

  7. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2014. "Heterogeneous Expectations, Optimal Monetary Policy, and the Merit of Policy Inertia," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100555, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2020. "Fiscal Stimulus In Expectations-Driven Liquidity Traps," Working Papers 0683, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    2. Beqiraj Elton & Di Bartolomeo Giovanni & Di Pietro Marco, 2017. "Beliefs formation and the puzzle of forward guidance power," wp.comunite 00131, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    3. Ilabaca, Francisco & Milani, Fabio, 2021. "Heterogeneous expectations, indeterminacy, and postwar US business cycles," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    4. Hommes, Cars H. & Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2017. "Managing unanchored, heterogeneous expectations and liquidity traps," BERG Working Paper Series 131, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    5. Robert Calvert Jump & Cars Hommes & Paul Levine, 2018. "Learning, Heterogeneity, and Complexity in the New Keynesian Model," Working Papers 20181807, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    6. Elton Beqiraj & Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Marco Di Pietro & Carolina Serpieri, 2020. "Bounded rationality and heterogeneous expectations: Euler versus anticipated-utility approach," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 249-273, August.
    7. Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2018. "Fiscal stimulus in an expectation driven liquidity trap," BERG Working Paper Series 138, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    8. Emanuel Gasteiger, 2015. "Do heterogeneous expectations constitute a challenge for policy interaction?," NBP Working Papers 214, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    9. Radke, Lucas & Wicknig, Florian, 2021. "Experience-Based Heterogeneity in Expectations and Monetary Policy," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242414, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Di Bartolomeo, Giovanni & Di Pietro, Marco & Giannini, Bianca, 2020. "Optimal monetary policy in a New Keynesian model with heterogeneous expectations," Dynare Working Papers 54, CEPREMAP.
    11. Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Carolina Serpieri, 2018. "Robust Optimal Policies in a Behavioural New Keynesian Model," JRC Working Papers JRC111603, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    12. Beqiraj Elton & Di Bartolomeo Giovanni & Serpieri Carolina, 2017. "Bounded-rationality and heterogeneous agents: Long or short forecasters?," wp.comunite 00132, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    13. Elias, Christopher J., 2022. "Adaptive learning with heterogeneous expectations in an estimated medium-scale New Keynesian model," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    14. Dennis Bonam & Gavin Goy, 2017. "Home biased expectations and macroeconomic imbalances in a monetary union," DNB Working Papers 556, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    15. Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2020. "Fiscal stimulus in expectations-driven liquidity traps," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 661-687.
    16. Hagenhoff, Tim & Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2019. "The Rationality Bias," BERG Working Paper Series 144, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    17. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Optimal Constrained Interest-Rate Rules under Heterogeneous Expectations," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 04/2021, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.
    18. Lustenhouwer, Joep & Hagenhoff, Tim, 2019. "The Rationality Bias," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203553, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Hagenhoff, Tim, 2018. "An aggregate welfare optimizing interest rate rule under heterogeneous expectations," BERG Working Paper Series 139, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.

  8. Emanuel Gasteiger, 2013. "Do heterogeneous expectations constitute a challenge for policy interaction?," Working Papers Series 2 13-02, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).

    Cited by:

    1. Ilabaca, Francisco & Milani, Fabio, 2021. "Heterogeneous expectations, indeterminacy, and postwar US business cycles," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    2. Elton Beqiraj & Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Marco Di Pietro & Carolina Serpieri, 2020. "Bounded rationality and heterogeneous expectations: Euler versus anticipated-utility approach," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 249-273, August.
    3. Hommes, Cars H. & Lustenhouwer, Joep & Mavromatis, Kostas, 2017. "Fiscal consolidations and heterogeneous expectations," BERG Working Paper Series 132, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    4. Beqiraj Elton & Di Bartolomeo Giovanni & Serpieri Carolina, 2017. "Bounded-rationality and heterogeneous agents: Long or short forecasters?," wp.comunite 00132, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
    5. Branch, William A. & Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2019. "Endogenously (non-)Ricardian beliefs," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 03/2019, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.

  9. Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2012. "Fiscal Foresight, Limited Information and the Effects of Government Spending Shocks," Working Papers Series 2 12-02, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).

    Cited by:

    1. Mr. Giovanni Melina & Adalgiso Amendola & Mario di Serio & Matteo Fragetta, 2019. "The Euro-Area Government Spending Multiplier at the Effective Lower Bound," IMF Working Papers 2019/133, International Monetary Fund.
    2. C. Glocker & G. Sestieri & P. Towbin, 2017. "Time-varying fiscal spending multipliers in the UK," Working papers 643, Banque de France.
    3. Quaghebeur, Ewoud, 2019. "Learning And The Size Of The Government Spending Multiplier," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(8), pages 3189-3224, December.
    4. Laumer, Sebastian, 2020. "Government spending and heterogeneous consumption dynamics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    5. Nicoletta Batini & Mr. Giovanni Melina & Mario di Serio & Matteo Fragetta, 2021. "Building Back Better: How Big Are Green Spending Multipliers?," IMF Working Papers 2021/087, International Monetary Fund.
    6. AMENDOLA, Adalgiso & DI SERIO, Mario & FRAGETTA, Matteo, 2018. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the Euro Area," CELPE Discussion Papers 153, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    7. Mr. Giovanni Melina & Mario di Serio & Matteo Fragetta, 2021. "The Impact of r-g on the Euro-Area Government Spending Multiplier," IMF Working Papers 2021/039, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Ilori, Ayobami E. & Paez-Farrell, Juan & Thoenissen, Christoph, 2022. "Fiscal policy shocks and international spillovers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    9. Glocker, Christian & Sestieri, Giulia & Towbin, Pascal, 2019. "Time-varying government spending multipliers in the UK," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 180-197.
    10. DI SERIO, Mario & FRAGETTA, Matteo & GASTEIGER, Emanuel, 2017. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the United States," CELPE Discussion Papers 150, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    11. Pallara, Kevin, 2016. "The dynamic effects of government spending: a FAVAR approach," MPRA Paper 92283, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  10. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2011. "Heterogeneous expectations, Taylor rules and the merit of monetary policy inertia," MPRA Paper 31004, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Ilabaca, Francisco & Milani, Fabio, 2021. "Heterogeneous expectations, indeterminacy, and postwar US business cycles," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    2. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Optimal Constrained Interest-Rate Rules under Heterogeneous Expectations," ECON WPS - Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 04/2021, TU Wien, Institute of Statistics and Mathematical Methods in Economics, Economics Research Unit.

  11. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Zhang, Shoujian, 2011. "Anticipation, learning and welfare: the case of distortionary taxation," MPRA Paper 30625, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Josef Hollmayr & Christian Matthes, 2013. "Learning about fiscal policy and the effects of policy uncertainty," Working Paper 13-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    2. Quaghebeur, Ewoud, 2019. "Learning And The Size Of The Government Spending Multiplier," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(8), pages 3189-3224, December.
    3. Hommes, Cars H. & Lustenhouwer, Joep & Mavromatis, Kostas, 2017. "Fiscal consolidations and heterogeneous expectations," BERG Working Paper Series 132, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    4. Emanuel Gasteiger, 2015. "Do heterogeneous expectations constitute a challenge for policy interaction?," NBP Working Papers 214, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    5. George W. Evans & Seppo Honkapohja & Kaushik Mitra, 2022. "Expectations, Stagnation and Fiscal Policy: a Nonlinear Analysis," Discussion Papers 22-01, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    6. De Grauwe, Paul & Foresti, Pasquale, 2018. "Animal Spirits and Fiscal Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 13376, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Seppo Honkapohja & Kaushik Mitra & George Evans, 2017. "Expectations, Stagnation and Fiscal Policy," 2017 Meeting Papers 160, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Erin Cottle Hunt, 2021. "Adaptive Learning, Social Security Reform, and Policy Uncertainty," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 53(4), pages 677-714, June.
    9. Brecht Boone & Ewoud Quaghebeur, 2017. "Real-Time Parameterized Expectations And The Effects Of Government Spending," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 17/939, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

Articles

  1. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2022. "Automation, Stagnation, And The Implications Of A Robot Tax," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(1), pages 218-249, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2021. "Optimal constrained interest-rate rules under heterogeneous expectations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 287-325.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Mario Di Serio & Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2020. "The Government Spending Multiplier at the Zero Lower Bound: Evidence from the United States," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 82(6), pages 1262-1294, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Gasteiger, Emanuel, 2018. "Do Heterogeneous Expectations Constitute A Challenge For Policy Interaction?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(8), pages 2107-2140, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Matteo Fragetta & Emanuel Gasteiger, 2014. "Fiscal Foresight, Limited Information and the Effects of Government Spending Shocks," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(5), pages 667-692, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Zhang, Shoujian, 2014. "Anticipation, learning and welfare: the case of distortionary taxation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 113-126.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Emanuel Gasteiger, 2014. "Heterogeneous Expectations, Optimal Monetary Policy, and the Merit of Policy Inertia," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(7), pages 1535-1554, October. See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 16 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (14) 2011-05-14 2013-03-23 2013-12-29 2015-02-22 2015-11-21 2016-08-07 2017-07-16 2018-01-08 2019-04-22 2019-07-08 2020-04-06 2020-04-20 2020-05-11 2021-04-26. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (8) 2011-05-30 2013-03-23 2015-02-22 2015-11-21 2016-08-07 2019-07-08 2020-04-20 2021-04-26. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (6) 2011-05-30 2013-03-23 2015-02-22 2019-07-08 2020-04-20 2021-04-26. Author is listed
  4. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (6) 2011-05-14 2017-03-26 2017-07-16 2020-04-06 2020-04-20 2021-04-26. Author is listed
  5. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (4) 2013-12-29 2018-01-08 2020-04-06 2020-05-11
  6. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (3) 2017-03-26 2017-07-16 2020-04-06
  7. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (3) 2017-03-26 2017-07-16 2020-04-06
  8. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (2) 2020-04-06 2021-04-26
  9. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2016-08-07
  10. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2019-07-08
  11. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2017-03-26
  12. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2020-05-11
  13. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (1) 2013-12-29

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