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Learning, Heterogeneity, and Complexity in the New Keynesian Model

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Listed:
  • Robert Calvert Jump

    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

  • Cars Hommes

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Paul Levine

    (University of Surrey)

Abstract

We present a New Keynesian model in which a fraction n of agents are fully rational, and a fraction 1 − n of agents are bounded rational. After deriving a simple reduced form, we demonstrate that the Taylor condition is sufficient for determinacy and stability, both when the proportion of fully rational agents is held fixed, and when it is allowed to vary according to reinforcement learning. However, this result relies on the absence of persistence in the monetary policy rule, and we demonstrate that the Taylor condition is not sufficient for determinacy and stability in the presence of interest rate smoothing. For monetary policy rules that imply indeterminacy, we demonstrate the existence of limit cycles via Hopf bifurcation, and explore a rational route to randomness numerically. Our results support the broader literature on behavioural New Keynesian models, in which the Taylor condition is known to be a useful guide to monetary policy, despite not always being sufficient for determinacy and/or stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Calvert Jump & Cars Hommes & Paul Levine, 2018. "Learning, Heterogeneity, and Complexity in the New Keynesian Model," Working Papers 20181807, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20181807
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E03 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Macroeconomics
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian; Modern Monetary Theory
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E70 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General
    • E71 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on the Macro Economy

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