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A Behavioral Model of the Credit Cycle

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Abstract

In a behavioral variant of a New Keynesian model, in which individuals use simple heuristic rules to forecast future in ation and output gap, if there are limits on the amount of debt that economic agents are allowed to bear, we observe occasionally severe downturns. Differences in beliefs combined with borrowing constraints tend to dampen expansions, but give rise to a chain reaction that exacerbates the recessions. The model is an example of endogenous credit cycles with expansions, severe recessions, and persistent inequality in the distribution of wealth. Monetary policy can both stabilize the economy and cause increased average output.

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  • Barbara Annicchiarico & Silvia Surricchio & Robert J. Waldmann, 2018. "A Behavioral Model of the Credit Cycle," CEIS Research Paper 446, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 30 Oct 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:446
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    Cited by:

    1. Hagenhoff, Tim & Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2019. "The Rationality Bias," BERG Working Paper Series 144, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Credit cycle; heuristic rules; monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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