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Behavioural New Keynesian Models

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  • Robert Calvert Jump

    (University of the West of England)

  • Paul Levine

    (University of Surrey and CIMS)

Abstract

This paper provides a bird's eye view of the behavioural New Keynesian literature. We discuss three key empirical regularities in macroeconomic data which are not ac- counted for by the standard New Keynesian model, namely, excess kurtosis, stochastic volatility, and departures from rational expectations. We then present a simple be- havioural New Keynesian model that accounts for these empirical regularities in a straightforward manner. We discuss elaborations and extensions of the basic model, and suggest areas for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Calvert Jump & Paul Levine, 2019. "Behavioural New Keynesian Models," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0219, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0219
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    1. Behavioural New Keynesian Models
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2019-03-03 04:24:55

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    Cited by:

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    6. De Grauwe, Paul & Foresti, Pasquale, 2023. "Interactions of fiscal and monetary policies under waves of optimism and pessimism," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 212(C), pages 466-481.
    7. Calvert Jump, Robert & Hommes, Cars & Levine, Paul, 2019. "Learning, heterogeneity, and complexity in the New Keynesian model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 446-470.
    8. Dave, Chetan & Sorge, Marco, 2023. "Fat Tailed DSGE Models: A Survey and New Results," Working Papers 2023-3, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    9. Dong, Xue & Minford, Patrick & Meenagh, David & Yang, Xiaoliang, 2023. "Bounded rational expectation: How it can affect the effectiveness of monetary rules in the open economy," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 88(C).
    10. Shobande Olatunji Abdul & Shodipe Oladimeji Tomiwa, 2019. "New Keynesian Liquidity Trap and Conventional Fiscal Stance: An Estimated DSGE Model," Economics and Business, Sciendo, vol. 33(1), pages 152-169, January.
    11. De Grauwe, Paul & Foresti, Pasquale, 2020. "Animal Spirits and Fiscal Policy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 247-263.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E70 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General
    • E71 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on the Macro Economy
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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