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Simple Forecasting Heuristics that Make us Smart: Evidence from Different Market Experiments

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Abstract

We study a model in which individual agents use simple linear first order price forecasting rules, adapting them to the complex evolving market environment with a smart Genetic Algorithm optimization procedure. The novelties are: (1) a parsimonious experimental foundation of individual forecasting behaviour; (2) an explanation of individual and aggregate behavior in four different experimental settings, (3) improved one-period and 50-period ahead forecasting of lab experiments, and (4) a characterization of the mean, median and empirical distribution of forecasting heuristics. The median of the distribution of GA forecasting heuristics can be used in designing or validating simple Heuristic Switching Model.

Suggested Citation

  • Mikhail Anufriev & Cars Hommes & Tomasz Makarewicz, 2015. "Simple Forecasting Heuristics that Make us Smart: Evidence from Different Market Experiments," Working Paper Series 29, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  • Handle: RePEc:uts:ecowps:29
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    1. repec:eee:dyncon:v:103:y:2019:i:c:p:234-259 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    3. Roger Guesnerie, 2005. "Assessing Rational Expectations 2: "Eductive" Stability in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262072580, March.
    4. Bolt, Wilko & Demertzis, Maria & Diks, Cees & Hommes, Cars & Leij, Marco van der, 2019. "Identifying booms and busts in house prices under heterogeneous expectations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 234-259.
    5. Jasmina Arifovic & James Bullard & Olena Kostyshyna, 2013. "Social Learning and Monetary Policy Rules," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(567), pages 38-76, March.
    6. Heemeijer, Peter & Hommes, Cars & Sonnemans, Joep & Tuinstra, Jan, 2009. "Price stability and volatility in markets with positive and negative expectations feedback: An experimental investigation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 1052-1072, May.
    7. Reinhart, Karmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. ""This time is different": panorama of eight centuries of financial crises," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 77-114, March.
    8. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Preface," MPRA Paper 17451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Evans, George W. & Ramey, Garey, 2006. "Adaptive expectations, underparameterization and the Lucas critique," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 249-264, March.
    10. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Chapter 1," MPRA Paper 17452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:spr:lnecms:978-3-642-31301-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Nick Feltovich, 2000. "Reinforcement-Based vs. Belief-Based Learning Models in Experimental Asymmetric-Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(3), pages 605-642, May.
    13. Sargent, Thomas J., 1993. "Bounded Rationality in Macroeconomics: The Arne Ryde Memorial Lectures," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288695.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nobuyuki Hanaki & Eizo Akiyama & Ryuichiro Ishikawa, 2017. "Effects of Eliciting Long-run Price Forecasts on Market Dynamics in Asset Market Experiments," GREDEG Working Papers 2017-26, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    2. repec:eee:dyncon:v:88:y:2018:i:c:p:51-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hommes, Cars, 2018. "Behavioral & experimental macroeconomics and policy analysis: a complex systems approach," Working Paper Series 2201, European Central Bank.
    4. repec:spr:joevec:v:27:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s00191-017-0511-y is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:kap:compec:v:50:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10614-016-9607-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hanaki, Nobuyuki & Akiyama, Eizo & Ishikawa, Ryuichiro, 2018. "Effects of different ways of incentivizing price forecasts on market dynamics and individual decisions in asset market experiments," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 51-69.
    7. Cars Hommes & Tomasz Makarewicz & Domenico Massaro & Tom Smits, 2017. "Genetic algorithm learning in a New Keynesian macroeconomic setup," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 27(5), pages 1133-1155, November.
    8. Barbara Annicchiarico & Silvia Surricchio & Robert J. Waldmann, 2018. "A Behavioral Model of the Credit Cycle," CEIS Research Paper 446, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 30 Oct 2018.
    9. Makarewicz, Tomasz, 2019. "Traders, forecasters and financial instability: A model of individual learning of anchor-and-adjustment heuristics," BERG Working Paper Series 141, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    10. Cars Hommes & Anita Kopányi-Peuker & Joep Sonnemans, "undated". "Bubbles, crashes and information contagion in large-group asset market experiments," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 19-016/II, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Expectation Formation; Learning to Forecast Experiment; Genetic Algorithm Model of Individual Learning;

    JEL classification:

    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations

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