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Gary John Robert Slater

Personal Details

First Name:Gary
Middle Name:John Robert
Last Name:Slater
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psl27

Affiliation

Leeds University Business School (LUBS)
University of Leeds

Leeds, United Kingdom
http://business.ac.uk/

: +44 (0) 113 233 4466
+44 (0) 113 233 4465
University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT
RePEc:edi:sbleeuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2004. "Agency working in Britain: character, consequences and regulation," Working Papers 2004/4, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.

Articles

  1. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2016. "Labour market regulation and the ‘competition state’: an analysis of the implementation of the Agency Working Regulations in the UK," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 30(4), pages 590-606, August.
  2. Bruce Philp & Gary Slater & Daniel Wheatley, 2015. "New Labour and work-time regulation: a Marxian analysis of the UK economy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(3), pages 711-732.
  3. Gary Slater & David A. Spencer, 2014. "Workplace relations, unemployment and finance-dominated capitalism," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 134-146, April.
  4. David Harvie & Gary Slater & Bruce Philp & Dan Wheatley, 2009. "Economic Well-being and British Regions: The Problem with GDP Per Capita," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(4), pages 483-505.
  5. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2005. "Agency Working in Britain: Character, Consequences and Regulation," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 249-271, June.
  6. Bruce Philp & Gary Slater & David Harvie, 2005. "Preferences, Power, and the Determination of Working Hours," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 75-90, March.
  7. Gary Slater, 2002. "The Poverty of Flexibility," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 243-251.
  8. Andrew Brown & Gary Slater & David A. Spencer, 2002. "Driven to abstraction? Critical realism and the search for the 'inner connection' of social phenomena," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(6), pages 773-788, November.
  9. Gary Slater & David A. Spencer, 2000. "The Uncertain Foundations of Transaction Costs Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 61-87, March.

Chapters

  1. Gary Slater, 2012. "Unemployment," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Marxist Economics, chapter 57, pages 360-366 Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2004. "Agency working in Britain: character, consequences and regulation," Working Papers 2004/4, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.

    Cited by:

    1. Chris Dawson & Michail Veliziotis, 2013. "Temporary employment, job satisfaction and subjective well-being," Working Papers 20131309, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    2. Rahul Suresh Sapkal, 2016. "Labour law, enforcement and the rise of temporary contract workers: empirical evidence from India’s organised manufacturing sector," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 157-182, August.
    3. René Böheim & Ana Rute Cardoso, 2009. "Temporary Help Services Employment in Portugal, 1995-2000," NBER Chapters,in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 309-334 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. C Green & J S Heywood, 2007. "Are flexible contracts bad for workers? Evidence from job satisfaction data," Working Papers 590927, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    5. Sarah Hamersma & Carolyn Heinrich & Peter Mueser, 2014. "Temporary Help Work: Earnings, Wages, and Multiple Job Holding," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 72-100, January.
    6. Heywood, John S. & Siebert, W. Stanley & Wei, Xiangdong, 2006. "Examining the Determinants of Agency Work: Do Family Friendly Practices Play a Role?," IZA Discussion Papers 2413, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Chris Forde & Robert MacKenzie, 2010. "The Ethical Agendas of Employment Agencies Towards Migrant Workers in the UK: Deciphering the Codes," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 97(1), pages 31-41, December.
    8. Francis Green, 2008. "Temporary Work and Insecurity in Britain: A Problem Solved?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 88(1), pages 147-160, August.
    9. Vanselow, Achim & Weinkopf, Claudia, 2009. "Zeitarbeit in europäischen Ländern: Lehren für Deutschland?," Arbeitspapiere 182, Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Düsseldorf.
    10. Jahn, Elke J. & Pozzoli, Dario, 2013. "The pay gap of temporary agency workers — Does the temp sector experience pay off?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 48-57.
    11. Alexander Schiersch, 2015. "TFP, Labor Productivity and the (Un)observed Labor Input: Temporary Agency Work," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1532, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Surhan Cam, 2014. "The Underemployed: Evidence From the UK Labour Force Survey for a Conditionally Gendered Top-down Model," Journal of Social Science Studies, Macrothink Institute, vol. 1(2), pages 47-65, July.
    13. Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Buch, Tanja, 2013. "Wage effects of labor market entry via temporary work agency employment - evidence for German apprenticeship graduates," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79818, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. Bryson, Alex, 2013. "Do temporary agency workers affect workplace performance?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 45610, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    15. Jahn, Elke J. & Pozzoli, Dario, 2011. "Does the Sector Experience Affect the Pay Gap for Temporary Agency Workers?," IZA Discussion Papers 5837, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Schiersch, Alexander, 2016. "Considering the (Un)observed: temporary agency work in productivity estimations," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145749, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Böheim, René & Cardoso, Ana Rute, 2007. "Temporary Agency Work in Portugal, 1995–2000," IZA Discussion Papers 3144, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. John T. Addison & Christopher J. Surfield, 2005. "‘Atypical Work’ and Compensation," GEMF Working Papers 2005-14, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    19. Linda Mcdowell & Adina Batnitzky & Sarah Dyer, 2009. "Precarious Work and Economic Migration: Emerging Immigrant Divisions of Labour in Greater London's Service Sector," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 3-25, March.
    20. Kim Hoque & Ian Kirkpatrick & Alex De Ruyter & Chris Lonsdale, 2008. "New Contractual Relationships in the Agency Worker Market: The Case of the UK's National Health Service," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(3), pages 389-412, September.
    21. Benjamin Hopkins & Chris Dawson, 2016. "Migrant workers and involuntary non-permanent jobs: agencies as new IR actors?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 163-180, March.
    22. Andersson Joona, Pernilla & Wadensjö, Eskil, 2012. "A Price for Flexibility? The Temp Agency Wage Gap in Sweden 1998-2008," IZA Discussion Papers 6587, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    23. J. Shackleton, 2007. "Britain’s Labor Market Under the Blair Governments," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 454-476, July.
    24. Jahn, Elke J., 2008. "Reassessing the Wage Penalty for Temps in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 3663, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    25. Linda McDowell & Adina Batnitzky & Sarah Dyer, 2008. "Internationalization and the Spaces of Temporary Labour: The Global Assembly of a Local Workforce," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 750-770, December.

Articles

  1. David Harvie & Gary Slater & Bruce Philp & Dan Wheatley, 2009. "Economic Well-being and British Regions: The Problem with GDP Per Capita," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(4), pages 483-505.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Wheatley & Craig Bickerton, 2017. "Subjective well-being and engagement in arts, culture and sport," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 41(1), pages 23-45, February.

  2. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2005. "Agency Working in Britain: Character, Consequences and Regulation," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 249-271, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Bruce Philp & Gary Slater & David Harvie, 2005. "Preferences, Power, and the Determination of Working Hours," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 75-90, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Alexei Izyumov & Trista Claxon, 2009. "Models of Capitalism and Income Distribution in Transition Economies: A Comparative Perspective," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 733-758.
    2. Weimin Ma & Xiaodong Ji, 2016. "Online Work-Break Problem and its Competitive Analysis," Asia-Pacific Journal of Operational Research (APJOR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 33(02), pages 1-17, April.

  4. Andrew Brown & Gary Slater & David A. Spencer, 2002. "Driven to abstraction? Critical realism and the search for the 'inner connection' of social phenomena," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(6), pages 773-788, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Brown, 2013. "Methodological issues in theorising the financial, economic and social system: realistic and systematic abstraction," Working papers wpaper03, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
    2. Andrew Mearman, 2004. "Critical Realism in Economics and Open-Systems Ontology: A Critique," Working Papers 0401, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Lee, Frederic, 2012. "Critical realism, grounded theory, and theory construction in heterodox economics," MPRA Paper 40341, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Philip Arestis & Andrew Brown & Malcolm Sawyer, 2002. "Critical Realism and the Political Economy of the Euro," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_352, Levy Economics Institute.
    5. Thomas Brenner & Claudia Werker, 2009. "Policy Advice Derived from Simulation Models," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 12(4), pages 1-2.
    6. Modell, Sven, 2017. "Critical realist accounting research: In search of its emancipatory potential," CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ACCOUNTING, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 20-35.
    7. Thomas Brenner & Claudia Werker, 2007. "A Taxonomy of Inference in Simulation Models," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 30(3), pages 227-244, October.

Chapters

  1. Gary Slater, 2012. "Unemployment," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Marxist Economics, chapter 57, pages 360-366 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    Cited by:

    1. Yun K. Kim & Gilberto Tadeu Lima, Mark Setterfield, 2017. "Political Aspects of Household Debt," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2017_15, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    2. Maarten Dossche & Vivien Lewis & Céline Poilly, 2016. "Employment, Hours and the Welfare Effects of Intra-Firm Bargaining," Working Papers halshs-01367174, HAL.
    3. Wickham James, 2011. "Low Skill Manufacturing Work: from skill biased change to technological Regression / Niedrig qualifizierte Industriearbeit: vom qualifikationsbeeinflussten Strukturwandel zur technologischen Regressio," Arbeit, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 224-238, September.
    4. Alexander Schiersch, 2015. "TFP, Labor Productivity and the (Un)observed Labor Input: Temporary Agency Work," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1532, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Schiersch, Alexander, 2016. "Considering the (Un)observed: temporary agency work in productivity estimations," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145749, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Eichhorst, Werner & Kendzia, Michael J. & al., et, 2013. "Report No. 57: The Role and Activities of Employment Agencies," IZA Research Reports 57, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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