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Temporary Help Work: Earnings, Wages and Multiple Job Holding

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Abstract

Temporary Help Services (THS) employment has been growing in size, particularly among disadvantaged workers. An extended policy debate focuses on the low earnings, limited benefits, and insecurity that such jobs appear to provide. We investigate the earnings and wage differentials observed between THS and other jobs in a sample of disadvantaged workers. We find lower quarterly earnings at THS jobs but a $1 per hour wage premium. We reconcile these findings in terms of the shorter duration and lower hours worked at THS jobs. We interpret the premium as a compensating wage differential.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter R. Mueser & Sarah Hamersma & Carolyn Heinrich, 2012. "Temporary Help Work: Earnings, Wages and Multiple Job Holding," Working Papers 1214, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  • Handle: RePEc:umc:wpaper:1214
    Note: Length: 54 pages
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    File URL: https://economics.missouri.edu/working-papers/2012/wp1214_mueser.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Adrienne T. Edisis, 2016. "The Effect of Unemployment Insurance on Temporary Help Services Employment," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 484-503, December.
    2. Benjamin Hopkins & Chris Dawson, 2016. "Migrant workers and involuntary non-permanent jobs: agencies as new IR actors?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 163-180, March.
    3. David H. Autor & Susan N. Houseman & Sari Pekkala Kerr, 2017. "The Effect of Work First Job Placements on the Distribution of Earnings: An Instrumental Variable Quantile Regression Approach," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 149-190.
    4. Susan N. Houseman & Carolyn Heinrich, 2015. "Temporary Help Employment in Recession and Recovery," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 15-227, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    5. Barbara J. Robles & Marysol McGee, 2016. "Exploring Online and Offline Informal Work : Findings from the Enterprising and Informal Work Activities (EIWA) Survey," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-089, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    temporary employment; compensating differential; quarterly earnings; wages; multiple jobs;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets

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