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The effects of an employer subsidy on employment outcomes: A study of the work opportunity and welfare-to-work tax credits

  • Sarah Hamersma

    (University of Florida)

Employer subsidies such as the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) and the Welfare-to-Work Tax Credit (WtW) are designed to encourage employment by partially reimbursing employers for wages paid to certain welfare recipients and other disadvantaged workers. In this paper, I examine the effects of these subsidies on employment, wages, and job tenure using unique administrative data from Wisconsin. My ability to precisely identify the subsidy-certified workers allows me to distinguish the effects of program participation from mere eligibility. Using propensity score matching estimation, I find some evidence of short-term improvements in labor market outcomes, but little evidence of sustained benefits. © 2008 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

Volume (Year): 27 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 498-520

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:27:y:2008:i:3:p:498-520
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  1. Timothy J. Bartik, 2001. "Jobs for the Poor: Can Labor Demand Policies Help?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number tjb2001, April.
  2. Jeffrey Smith & Petra Todd, 2003. "Does Matching Overcome Lalonde's Critique of Nonexperimental Estimators?," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20035, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  3. John H. Bishop & Suk Kang, 1991. "Applying for entitlements: Employers and the targeted jobs tax credit," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 24-45.
  4. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
  5. Blundell, Richard & Meghir, Costas, 2002. "Active labour market policy vs employment tax credits: lessons from recent UK reforms," Working Paper Series 2002:1, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
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