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Do Changes in Regulation Affect Temporary Agency Workers’ Job Satisfaction?

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  • Henna Busk
  • Christine Dauth
  • Elke J. Jahn

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact on temporary agency workers’ job satisfaction of a reform that considerably relaxed regulations covering the temporary help service sector in Germany. We isolate the causal effect of this reform by combining a difference-in-difference and matching approach and using rich survey data. We find that the change of the law substantially decreased agency workers’ job satisfaction while regular workers’ job satisfaction remained unchanged. Further analysis reveals that the negative effect on agency workers’ job satisfaction can be attributed to a decrease in wages and an increase in perceived job insecurity. These results are also robust to the use of different specifications and placebo tests.
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Suggested Citation

  • Henna Busk & Christine Dauth & Elke J. Jahn, 2017. "Do Changes in Regulation Affect Temporary Agency Workers’ Job Satisfaction?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 514-544, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indres:v:56:y:2017:i:3:p:514-544
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/irel.12184
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    Cited by:

    1. Möller, Joachim, 2015. "Verheißung oder Bedrohung? : die Arbeitsmarktwirkungen einer vierten industriellen Revolution," IAB Discussion Paper 201518, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Andrew E. Clark, 2018. "Four Decades of the Economics of Happiness: Where Next?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 64(2), pages 245-269, June.
    3. Jennifer Ferreira, 2016. "The German temporary staffing industry: growth, development, scandal and resistance," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(2), pages 117-143, March.
    4. repec:spr:inrvec:v:65:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s12232-018-0300-4 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J88 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Public Policy

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