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An analysis of the determinants of job satisfaction when individuals' baseline satisfaction levels may differ

  • Anna Cristina D'Addio
  • Tor Eriksson
  • Paul Frijters

A growing literature seeks to explain differences in individuals' self-reported satisfaction with their jobs. The evidence so far has mainly been based on cross-sectional data and when panel data have been used, individual unobserved heterogeneity has been modelled as an ordered probit model with random effects. This article makes use of longitudinal data for Denmark, taken from the waves 1995-1999 of the European Community Household Panel, and estimates fixed effects ordered logit models using the estimation methods proposed by Ferrer-i-Carbonel and Frijters (2004) and Das and van Soest (1999). For comparison and testing purposes a random effects ordered probit is also estimated. Estimations are carried out separately on the samples of men and women for individuals' overall satisfaction with the jobs they hold. We find that using the fixed effects approach (that clearly rejects the random effects specification), considerably reduces the number of key explanatory variables. The impact of central economic factors is the same as in previous studies, though. Moreover, the determinants of job satisfaction differ considerably between the genders, in particular once individual fixed effects are allowed for.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2007)
Issue (Month): 19 ()
Pages: 2413-2423

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:19:p:2413-2423
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