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How do spouses share their full income ? Identification of the sharing rule using self-reported income

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Abstract

The paper applies the collective model to the analysis of intra-household inequality using self-reported income scales. Starting from a collective model including household production, our key assumption is that the income level that household members report corresponds to their true income sharing. Using Russian data (Rounds V to VIII of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey), we apply the results for couples who report the same level of income to identify the sharing rule for the whole sample. This method allows us to obtain not only the derivatives, but also the sharing rule itself. From simulations for an average couple with one child living in the Urals, we find that a full income share of 45% is allocated to the wife.

Suggested Citation

  • Ekaterina Kalugina & Natalia Radtchenko & Catherine Sofer, 2006. "How do spouses share their full income ? Identification of the sharing rule using self-reported income," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques bla06012, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:wpsorb:bla06012
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    Cited by:

    1. Guy Lacroix & Natalia Radtchenko, 2011. "The changing intra-household resource allocation in Russia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(1), pages 85-106, January.
    2. Natalia Radtchenko, 2009. "Identifying Intra-household Welfare Distribution," Documents de recherche 09-04, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    3. Lucia Mangiavacchi & Chiara Rapallini, 2014. "Self-Reported Economic Condition And Home Production: Intra-Household Allocation In Italy," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 279-304, July.
    4. Ekaterina Kalugina & Catherine Sofer & Natalia Radtchenko, 2009. "Intra-household inequality in transitional Russia," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 447-471, December.
    5. J. Ignacio Giménez-Nadal & Lucia Mangiavacchi & Luca Piccoli, 2016. "Mobility across generations of the gender distribution of housework," DEA Working Papers 80, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Departament d'Economía Aplicada.
    6. Antonella Caiumi & Federico Perali, 2015. "Who bears the full cost of children? Evidence from a collective demand system," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 33-64, August.
    7. Molina, José Alberto & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Velilla, Jorge, 2018. "Intertemporal Labor Supply: A Household Collective Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11276, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Susanne Elsas, 2016. "Income Sharing within Households: Evidence from Data on Financial Satisfaction," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-16, September.
    9. Susanne Elsas, 2013. "Pooling and Sharing Income within Households: A Satisfaction Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 587, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Luca Piccoli, 2017. "Female poverty and intrahousehold inequality in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 353-353, March.
    11. Natalia Radchenko, 2016. "Welfare Sharing Within Households: Identification from Subjective Well-being Data and the Collective Model of Labor Supply," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 254-271, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Collective model; within-household income comparisons; subjective data; Russia; sharing rule.;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables

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