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Household division of labor: Is there any escape from traditional gender roles?



The effects of women's strong investments in career and their relative positions on the household division of labor, particularly the share of male partners in household work, constitute important but somehow unaddressed issues. We use the French Time Use Survey, focusing on couples where both partners participate in the labor market, to build indicators of strong female investment in career, and look into the possible effect on the gender division of labor, particularly the male share of household work. We show that though a better relative position of the woman in the labor market increases her husband's share of household work, there is no role reversal in the division of labor

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  • Sayyid Salman Rizavi & Catherine Sofer, 2010. "Household division of labor: Is there any escape from traditional gender roles?," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 10009, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:10009

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Baroni, Michel & Barthélémy, Fabrice & Mokrane, Mahdi, 2005. "A PCA Factor Repeat Sales Index (1973-2001) To Forecast Apartment Prices in Paris (France)," ESSEC Working Papers DR 05002, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
    2. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2011. "Remittances as a social status signaling device," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 305-318, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hélène Couprie & Elisabeth Cudeville & Catherine Sofer, 2015. "Efficiency versus Stereotypes: an Experiment in Domestic Production," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01162474, HAL.
    2. Ainhoa Herrarte & Julián Moral-Carcedo & Felipe Sáez, 2012. "The impact of childbirth on Spanish women’s decisions to leave the labor market," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 441-468, September.
    3. Catherine Sofer & Claire Thibout, 2016. "Women’s Investment in Career and Household Division of Labor," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n38, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Hélène Couprie & Elisabeth Cudeville & Catherine Sofer, 2017. "Efficiency versus Gender Roles and Stereotypes: An Experiment in Domestic Production," THEMA Working Papers 2017-10, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    5. Hans Bloemen & Elena Stancanelli, 2015. "Toyboys or supergirls? An analysis of partners’ employment outcomes when she outearns him," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 501-530, September.

    More about this item


    Household work; labor market; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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