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The Effect of Health on Income: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Commuting Accidents

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  • Martin Halla
  • Martina Zweimüller

Abstract

This paper interprets accidents occurring on the way to and from work as negative health shocks to identify the causal effect of health on labor market outcomes. We argue that in our sample of exactly matched treated and control workers, these health shocks are quasi-randomly assigned. A fixed-effects difference-in-differences approach estimates a negative and persistent effect on subsequent employment and income. After initial periods with a higher incidence of sick leave, treated workers are more likely unemployed, and a growing share of them leaves the labor market via disability retirement. Those treated workers, who manage to stay in employment, incur persistent income losses. The effects are stronger for sub-groups of workers who are typically less attached to the labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Halla & Martina Zweimüller, 2011. "The Effect of Health on Income: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Commuting Accidents," Economics working papers 2011-04, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, revised Feb 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:jku:econwp:2011_04
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Ahammer & G. Thomas Horvath & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2017. "The effect of income on mortality—new evidence for the absence of a causal link," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 180(3), pages 793-816, June.
    2. David M. Zimmer, 2015. "Employment Effects Of Health Shocks: The Role Of Fringe Benefits," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 346-358, October.
    3. Yevgeniy Goryakin & Lorenzo Rocco & Marc Suhrcke & Bayard Roberts & Martin McKee, 2014. "The effect of health on labour supply in nine former Soviet Union countries," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(1), pages 57-68, January.
    4. Romem, Issi & Shurtz, Ity, 2016. "The accident externality of driving: Evidence from observance of the Jewish Sabbath in Israel," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 36-54.
    5. Busk, Henna & Jahn, Elke J. & Dauth, Christine, 2015. "Do Changes in Regulation Affect Temporary Agency Workers' Job Satisfaction?," IZA Discussion Papers 8803, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2014. "The Effect of Non-Work Related Health Events on Career Outcomes: An Evaluation in the French Labor Market," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 124(3), pages 437-465.
    7. Pilar Garcia-Gomez & Hans van Kippersluis & Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2011. "Effects of Health on Own and Spousal Employment and Income using Acute Hospital Admissions," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-143/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Titus J. Galama & Hans van Kippersluis, 2013. "Health Inequalities through the Lens of Health Capital Theory: Issues, Solutions, and Future Directions," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-076/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy Van Doorslaer & Tom Van Ourti, 2013. "Health and Inequality," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-170/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. ZHAO Meng (KONISHI Moe), 2017. "Health-Related Income Gaps and the Effectiveness of Redistributive Policies in Japan," Discussion papers 17039, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    11. Maria Cervini-Plá & Jose I. Silva & Judit Vall Castelló, 2016. "Estimating the income loss of disabled individuals: the case of Spain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 809-829, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health; employment; income;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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