IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/empeco/v51y2016i2d10.1007_s00181-015-1019-7.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Estimating the income loss of disabled individuals: the case of Spain

Author

Listed:
  • Maria Cervini-Plá

    () (Universitat Pompeu Fabra & EQUALITAS)

  • Jose I. Silva

    () (University of Girona)

  • Judit Vall Castelló

    () (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)

Abstract

Abstract In this paper, we present a theoretical model along with an empirical model to identify the effects of disability on wages. From the theoretical model, we derive the hypothesis that only the temporary component of the wage gap, which is due to assimilation costs, will diminish over time, whereas the permanent element, which is due to the productivity loss after the disabling condition, will in fact persist. We test this theoretical hypothesis using an exogenous disability shock (accident) and combine propensity score matching with a difference-in-differences method to account for observed and unobserved time-constant differences. In all our specifications, we find that the reduction in wages for the disabled is between 274 and 308 euros per month, and this represents 19–22 % of the average wage of a disabled worker. This gap, however, is more than offset when we count disability benefits and wages collectively as income. As predicted in the theoretical model, we observe that around 40 % of the initial wage gap between disabled and non-disabled individuals is reversed once the transitory drop in productivity disappears. However, we also observe a constant wage gap that remains over time and that corresponds to the permanent fall in productivity predicted by the theoretical model (60 % of the initial wage gap).

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Cervini-Plá & Jose I. Silva & Judit Vall Castelló, 2016. "Estimating the income loss of disabled individuals: the case of Spain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 809-829, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:51:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s00181-015-1019-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-015-1019-7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00181-015-1019-7
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    2. (*), Nigel Rice & Paul Contoyannis, 2001. "The impact of health on wages: Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 599-622.
    3. Wu, Stephen, 2001. "Adapting to heart conditions: a test of the hedonic treadmill," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 495-507, July.
    4. repec:spr:portec:v:1:y:2002:i:2:d:10.1007_s10258-002-0010-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias, 2009. "Alternative Approaches to Evaluation in Empirical Microeconomics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(3).
    6. Oswald, Andrew J. & Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2008. "Does happiness adapt? A longitudinal study of disability with implications for economists and judges," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1061-1077, June.
    7. Alberto Abadie & David Drukker & Jane Leber Herr & Guido W. Imbens, 2004. "Implementing matching estimators for average treatment effects in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 290-311, September.
    8. Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Martin & Vikström, Johan, 2011. "Socioeconomic heterogeneity in the effect of health shocks on earnings: evidence from population-wide data on Swedish workers," Working Paper Series 2011:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    9. Kidd, Michael P. & Sloane, Peter J. & Ferko, Ivan, 2000. "Disability and the labour market: an analysis of British males," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 961-981, November.
    10. Heckman, J.J. & Hotz, V.J., 1988. "Choosing Among Alternative Nonexperimental Methods For Estimating The Impact Of Social Programs: The Case Of Manpower Training," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 88-12, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
    11. Alberto Abadie & Guido W. Imbens, 2002. "Simple and Bias-Corrected Matching Estimators for Average Treatment Effects," NBER Technical Working Papers 0283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Kerwin Kofi Charles, 2003. "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(3).
    13. Martin Halla & Martina Zweimüller, 2011. "The Effect of Health on Income: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Commuting Accidents," NRN working papers 2011-03, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, revised Feb 2012.
    14. Michael Lechner & Rosalia Vazquez-Alvarez, 2011. "The effect of disability on labour market outcomes in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(4), pages 389-412.
    15. Miguel Á. MALO & Ricardo PAGÁN, 2012. "Wage differentials and disability across Europe: Discrimination and/or lower productivity?," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 151(1-2), pages 43-60, June.
    16. Wallace K. C. Mok & Bruce D. Meyer & Kerwin Kofi Charles & Alexandra C. Achen, 2008. "A Note on "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers"," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 721-728.
    17. Pilar García-Gómez & Hans van Kippersluis & Owen O’Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2013. "Long-Term and Spillover Effects of Health Shocks on Employment and Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 873-909.
    18. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cervini-Plá, María & Vall-Castello, Judit, 2015. "The Earnings and Employment Losses Before Entering the Disability System," IZA Discussion Papers 8913, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. repec:eee:labeco:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:23-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Demianova, Anna & Lukiyanova, Anna, 2016. "The impact of disability status on labor supply in Russia," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 44, pages 50-74.
    4. Begoña Cueto & Miguel A. Malo, 2016. "Do Partial Disability Pensions Close the Earnings Gap?," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 216(1), pages 103-126, March.
    5. Eva Frutos & Judit Castello, 2015. "Equal health, equal work? The role of disability benefits in employment after controlling for health status," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(3), pages 329-340, April.
    6. Jose I. Silva & Judit Vall-Castello, 2013. "Partial Disability System and Labor Market Adjustment: The Case of Spain," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 13-201, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disabled workers; Earnings gap; Matching techniques;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:51:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s00181-015-1019-7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.