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Outsourcing, Offshoring, and Productivity Measurement in Manufacturing




I discuss reasons why manufacturing productivity statistics should be interpreted with caution in light of the recent growth of domestic and foreign outsourcing and offshoring. First, outsourcing and offshoring are poorly measured in U.S. statistics, and poor measurement may impart a significant bias to manufacturing and, where offshoring is involved, aggregate productivity statistics. Second, companies often outsource or offshore work to take advantage of cheap (relative to their output) labor, and such cost savings are counted as productivity gains, even in multifactor productivity calculations. This fact has potentially important implications for the interpretation of productivity statistics. Whether, for instance, productivity growth derives from a better-educated, more efficient U.S. workforce, from investment in capital equipment in U.S. establishments, or from the use of cheap foreign labor affects how productivity gains are distributed among workers and firms in the short term and undoubtedly matters for U.S. industrial competitiveness and living standards in the long term. Although it is impossible to fully assess the impact that mismeasurement and cost savings from outsourcing and offshoring have had on measured productivity growth in manufacturing, I point to several pieces of evidence that suggest it is significant, and I argue that these issues warrant serious attention. I am grateful to Katharine Abraham, Mike Harper, Peter Meyer, Anne Polivka, Ken Ryder, Larry Summers, Lisa Usher, Robert Yuskavage, and seminar participants at the Federal Reserve Bank– Chicago for comments on an earlier draft of this paper, and to Mary Streitweisser and James Franklin for supplying detailed information on the construction of BEA's input-output estimates and their use in productivity calculations. Lillian Vesic-Petroic provided excellent research assistance. Any remaining errors as well as the views expressed in this piece are my own.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Houseman, 2006. "Outsourcing, Offshoring, and Productivity Measurement in Manufacturing," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 06-130, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:06-130

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mary Amiti & Shang-Jin Wei, 2005. "Fear of service outsourcing: is it justified?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 20(42), pages 308-347, April.
    2. Ana Aizcorbe & Stephen D Oliner & Daniel E Sichel, 2008. "Shifting Trends in Semiconductor Prices and the Pace of Technological Progress," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 43(3), pages 23-39, July.
    3. Mark E. Schweitzer & Saeed Zaman, 2006. "Are we engineering ourselves out of manufacturing jobs?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Jan.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Hamersma & Carolyn Heinrich & Peter Mueser, 2014. "Temporary Help Work: Earnings, Wages, and Multiple Job Holding," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 72-100, January.
    2. Britton Lombardi & Yukako Ono, 2008. "Professional employer organizations: What are they, who uses them, and why should we care?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 2-14.
    3. Robert C. Feenstra & Benjamin R. Mandel & Marshall B. Reinsdorf & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2013. "Effects of Terms of Trade Gains and Tariff Changes on the Measurement of US Productivity Growth," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 59-93, February.

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    offshoring; productivity; manufacturing; outsourcing; measurement; houseman;

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