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The effect of parental Medicaid expansions on job mobility

Author

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  • Hamersma, Sarah
  • Kim, Matthew

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the effect of parental Medicaid expansions on job mobility. If expanded Medicaid eligibility makes it easier for a person to have health coverage between jobs, we expect it to reduce "job lock" that occurs for workers with employer-provided health insurance. Expanded eligibility could also decrease mobility among those in jobs without health insurance, since they experience less pressure to move to an insured job ("job push"). We find strong evidence that expanded eligibility reduces job lock among unmarried women but not men or married women, and only weak evidence of reduced job push among men.

Suggested Citation

  • Hamersma, Sarah & Kim, Matthew, 2009. "The effect of parental Medicaid expansions on job mobility," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 761-770, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:28:y:2009:i:4:p:761-770
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anna Aizer & Jeffrey Grogger, 2003. "Parental Medicaid Expansions and Health Insurance Coverage," NBER Working Papers 9907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Gruber, Jonathan & Madrian, Brigitte C, 1995. "Health-Insurance Availability and the Retirement Decision," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 938-948, September.
    3. Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Taxes and Health Insurance," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 16, pages 37-66 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Busch, Susan H. & Duchovny, Noelia, 2005. "Family coverage expansions: Impact on insurance coverage and health care utilization of parents," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 876-890, September.
    5. Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black & Frank A. Scott, 2004. "Is There Job Lock? Evidence from the Pre-HIPAA Era," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 953-976, April.
    6. Brigitte C. Madrian, 1994. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is there Evidence of Job-Lock?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 27-54.
    7. Donna B. Gilleskie & Byron F. Lutz, 1999. "The Impact of Employer-Provided Health Insurance on Dynamic Employment Transitions," NBER Working Papers 7307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Hamersma Sarah, 2013. "The Effects of Medicaid Earnings Limits on Earnings Growth among Poor Workers," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 13(2), pages 887-919, August.
    9. Donna B. Gilleskie & Byron F. Lutz, 2002. "The Impact of Employer-Provided Health Insurance on Dynamic Employment Transitions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 129-162.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert W. Fairlie & Kanika Kapur & Susan Gates, 2016. "Job Lock: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 92-121, January.
    2. Laura Dague & Thomas DeLeire & Lindsey Leininger, 2014. "The Effect of Public Insurance Coverage for Childless Adults on Labor Supply," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 14-213, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    3. Hamersma, Sarah & Kim, Matthew, 2013. "Participation and crowd out: Assessing the effects of parental Medicaid expansions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 160-171.
    4. Sarah Hamersma & Carolyn Heinrich & Peter Mueser, 2014. "Temporary Help Work: Earnings, Wages, and Multiple Job Holding," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 72-100, January.
    5. repec:eee:jcecon:v:46:y:2018:i:1:p:270-283 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. David Yaskewich, 2015. "Dependent Health Insurance Laws and College Enrollment: Is There Evidence of College Lock?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 557-569, December.
    7. Kumar, Anil, 2017. "Does Medicaid Generosity Affect Household Income?," Working Papers 1709, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    8. Lucie Schmidt & Lara Shore-Sheppard & Tara Watson, 2016. "The Effect of Safety-Net Programs on Food Insecurity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(3), pages 589-614.
    9. Chatterji, Pinka & Brandon, Peter & Markowitz, Sara, 2016. "Job mobility among parents of children with chronic health conditions: Early effects of the 2010 Affordable Care Act," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 26-43.
    10. repec:spr:scient:v:101:y:2014:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1383-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Thomas G. Koch, 2015. "All Internal in the Family?: Measuring Spillovers from Public Health Insurance," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(4), pages 959-979.
    12. Barkowski, Scott, 2015. "Does Defensive Medicine Reduce Health Care Spending?," MPRA Paper 64318, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Melanie Guldi & Lucie Schmidt, 2017. "Taxes, Transfers, and Women’s Labor Supply in the United States," Working Papers 2017-01, University of Central Florida, Department of Economics.
    14. repec:lrc:larrss:v:2:y:2017:i:3:p:1-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Boyle, Melissa A. & Lahey, Joanna N., 2016. "Spousal labor market effects from government health insurance: Evidence from a veterans affairs expansion," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 63-76.
    16. Vincenzo Andrietti & Vincent A. Hildebrand, 2016. "Evaluating Pension Portability Reforms: The Tax Reform Act Of 1986 As A Natural Experiment Abstract," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(3), pages 1402-1424, July.
    17. Thomas Buchmueller & John C. Ham & Lara D. Shore-Sheppard, 2015. "The Medicaid Program," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 1, pages 21-136 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Boudreaux, Michel & Lipton, Brandy, 2018. "Medicaid Benefit Generosity and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Medicaid Adult Vision Benefits," MPRA Paper 83916, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Vincent Pohl, 2014. "Medicaid and the Labor Supply of Single Mothers: Implications for Health Care Reform," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 15-222, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    20. repec:bla:coecpo:v:35:y:2017:i:3:p:457-471 is not listed on IDEAS

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