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Is There Job Lock? Evidence from the Pre-HIPAA Era

Author

Listed:
  • Mark C. Berger

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kentucky)

  • Dan A. Black

    () (Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University)

  • Frank A. Scott

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Kentucky)

Abstract

We estimate discrete time hazard models of employment duration and standard logarithmic wage equations using the 1987 and 1990 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine the phenomenon of job lock. We test for job lock using differences-in-differences approaches among those with and without employer-provided health insurance and family members with and without health problems. We find no statistically significant evidence of job lock on employment duration or wages using this approach. We do find some evidence of shorter employment spells for those with employer-provided health insurance and spouse-provided health insurance, and longer employment spells for those with employer-provided health insurance and large families. Others have interpreted these findings as evidence of job lock. However, the wage equation results using these measures are not consistent with job lock. Although anecdotal evidence makes it clear that some workers have been locked into less-than-optimal jobs because of the combination of health problems and employer-provided health insurance, our results do not suggest that this phenomenon is pervasive in the U.S. economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black & Frank A. Scott, 2004. "Is There Job Lock? Evidence from the Pre-HIPAA Era," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 953-976, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:70:4:y:2004:p:953-976
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert W. Fairlie & Kanika Kapur & Susan Gates, 2016. "Job Lock: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 92-121, January.
    2. Anna Huysse-Gaytandjieva & Wim Groot & Milena Pavlova, 2013. "A New Perspective on Job Lock," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(3), pages 587-610, July.
    3. Gulcin Gumus & Tracy Regan, 2007. "Self-Employment and the Role of Health Insurance," Working Papers 0910, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    4. Peter A. Groothuis & James Richard Hill, 2009. "Correcting for Survival Effects in Cross Section Wage Equations Using NBA Data," Working Papers 09-19, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    5. David Yaskewich, 2015. "Dependent Health Insurance Laws and College Enrollment: Is There Evidence of College Lock?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 557-569, December.
    6. Brigitte C. Madrian, 2005. "The U.S. health care system and labor markets," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 50(Jun), pages 137-163.
    7. Stéphanie Lluis & Jean Abraham, 2013. "The Wage–Health Insurance Trade-off and Worker Selection: Evidence From the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 1997 to 2006," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 541-581, April.
    8. Harley Frazis & Mark A. Loewenstein, 2009. "How Responsive are Quits to Benefits?," Working Papers 426, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    9. Hamersma, Sarah & Kim, Matthew, 2009. "The effect of parental Medicaid expansions on job mobility," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 761-770, July.
    10. Kuo-Liang Chang & George Langelett & Andrew Waugh, 2011. "Health, Health Insurance, and Decision to Exit from Farming," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 356-372, June.
    11. Henry S. Farber, 2005. "Comments on Madrian’s “The U.S. Health Care System and Labor Markets”," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 50(Jun), pages 165-172.
    12. Chatterji, Pinka & Brandon, Peter & Markowitz, Sara, 2016. "Job mobility among parents of children with chronic health conditions: Early effects of the 2010 Affordable Care Act," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 26-43.
    13. David Mushinski & Alexandra Bernasek & Stephan Weiler, 2015. "Job Lock in Rural versus Urban Labor Markets," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 253-273, June.
    14. Vincenzo Andrietti & Vincent A. Hildebrand, 2016. "Evaluating Pension Portability Reforms: The Tax Reform Act Of 1986 As A Natural Experiment Abstract," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(3), pages 1402-1424, July.
    15. Chute, Benjamin W. & Wunnava, Phanindra V., 2015. "Is There a Link Between Employer-Provided Health Insurance and Job Mobility? Evidence from Recent Micro Data," IZA Discussion Papers 8989, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Barkowski, Scott, 2015. "Does Government Health Insurance Reduce Job Lock and Job Push?," MPRA Paper 63991, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Apr 2015.
    17. Harris, Douglas N. & Adams, Scott J., 2007. "Understanding the level and causes of teacher turnover: A comparison with other professions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 325-337, June.
    18. Harley Frazis & Mark A. Loewenstein, 2013. "How Responsive are Quits to Benefits?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 969-997.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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