IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/mes/jeciss/v43y2009i3p733-758.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Models of Capitalism and Income Distribution in Transition Economies: A Comparative Perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Alexei Izyumov
  • Trista Claxon

Abstract

During the 1990s, all of the European transition economies (TE) experienced a major recession and suffered from the explosion of income inequality. However, distribution of income between labor and capital differed greatly from one group of post-communist countries to another. The paper discusses and analyzes linkages between models of capitalism that emerged in former communist countries in the 1990s and the outcome of capitalist transition for labor in terms of income distribution and inequality. It is based on the estimates of the Marxian rate of exploitation and other indicators of labor income performance during the reform period.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexei Izyumov & Trista Claxon, 2009. "Models of Capitalism and Income Distribution in Transition Economies: A Comparative Perspective," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 733-758.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:jeciss:v:43:y:2009:i:3:p:733-758
    DOI: 10.2753/JEI0021-3624430308
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2753/JEI0021-3624430308
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mitra, Pradeep & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 2006. "Increasing inequality in transition economies : is there more to come?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4007, The World Bank.
    2. Zbigniew Matkowski, 2004. "Postsocialist Countries : Macroeconomic Performance, Growth Prospects, and Social Welfare," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(3), pages 44-80, May.
    3. Robert Boyer, 2005. "How and why capitalisms differ," Post-Print halshs-00754052, HAL.
    4. Simon Johnson & Daniel Kaufman & Andrei Shleifer, 1997. "The Unofficial Economy in Transition," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 28(2), pages 159-240.
    5. Bruce Philp & Gary Slater & David Harvie, 2005. "Preferences, Power, and the Determination of Working Hours," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 75-90, March.
    6. Christopher Gerry & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2008. "Inequality, democracy and taxation: Lessons from the post-communist transition," Europe-Asia Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 60(1), pages 89-111.
    7. Boyer, Robert, 2005. "How and Why Capitalisms Differ," MPIfG Discussion Paper 05/4, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    8. Geoffrey M. Hodgson, 2006. "Institutions, Recessions and Recovery in the Transitional Economies," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 875-894, December.
    9. Sukiassyan, Grigor, 2007. "Inequality and growth: What does the transition economy data say?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 35-56, March.
    10. Vladimir Popov, 2006. "Shock Therapy Versus Gradualism Reconsidered: Lessons From Transition Economies After 15 Years Of Reforms," Working Papers w0068, New Economic School (NES).
    11. Arjun Jayadev, 2007. "Capital account openness and the labour share of income," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(3), pages 423-443, May.
    12. Robert Boyer, 2005. "How and why capitalisms differ," Post-Print hal-00812971, HAL.
    13. Thorsten Beck & Luc Laeven, 2006. "Institution building and growth in transition economies," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 157-186, June.
    14. Milan Vodopivec & Andreas Wörgötter & Dhushyanth Raju, 2005. "Unemployment Benefit Systems in Central and Eastern Europe: A Review of the 1990s1," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 47(4), pages 615-651, December.
    15. Milan Zafirovski, 2005. "Labor Markets’ Institutional Properties And Distributive Justice In Modern Society: A Comparative Empirical Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 72(1), pages 51-97, May.
    16. Jan Svejnar, 2002. "Transition Economies: Performance and Challenges," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 3-28, Winter.
    17. Blanchard, Olivier, 1998. "The Economics of Post-Communist Transition," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198293996.
    18. Tito Boeri & Katherine Terrell, 2002. "Institutional Determinants of Labor Reallocation in Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 51-76, Winter.
    19. Josef C. Brada, 1996. "Privatization Is Transition--Or Is It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 67-86, Spring.
    20. Jens Hölscher, 2006. "Income Distribution and Convergence in the Transition Process – A Cross-Country Comparison," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 48(2), pages 302-325, June.
    21. Martin H. Wolfson, 2003. "Neoliberalism and the Social Structure of Accumulation," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 35(3), pages 255-262, September.
    22. Aristidis Bitzenis & John Marangos, 2007. "Globalization and the Integration-Assisted Transition in Central and Eastern European Economies," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 427-434, June.
    23. Veblen, Thorstein, 1899. "The Theory of the Leisure Class," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number veblen1899.
    24. Alexei Izyumov & Sofia Alterman, 2005. "The General Rate of Profit in a New Market Economy: Conceptual Issues and Estimates," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 476-493, December.
    25. Christos Kalantaridis, 2007. "Institutional Change in Post-Socialist Regimes: Public Policy and Beyond," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 435-442, June.
    26. Seeth, Harm Tho & Chachnov, Sergei & Surinov, Alexander & Von Braun, Joachim, 1998. "Russian poverty: Muddling through economic transition with garden plots," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(9), pages 1611-1624, September.
    27. Edward N. Wolff, 2001. "The recent rise of profits in the United States," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 315-324, September.
    28. Andrei Yakovlev, 2006. "The evolution of business – state interaction in Russia: From state capture to business capture?," Europe-Asia Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 58(7), pages 1033-1056.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sara ROSE & Crina VIJU, 2014. "Income inequality in post-communist Central and Eastern European countries," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 5, pages 5-20, June.
    2. Alexei Izyumov & John Vahaly, 2015. "Income Shares Revisited," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 179-188, March.
    3. Akbar, Yusaf H. & Kisilowski, Maciej, 2015. "Managerial agency, risk, and strategic posture: Nonmarket strategies in the transitional core and periphery," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 984-996.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. El-hadj Bah & Josef C. Brada, 2014. "Labor Markets in the Transition Economies: An Overview," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 11(1), pages 3-53, June.
    2. David Neilson, 2021. "Beyond Regressive Nationalism and the Neoliberal Model of Development," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 53(1), pages 17-34, March.
    3. Facchini, Giovanni & Segnana, Maria Luigia, 2003. "Growth at the EU periphery: the next enlargement," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 827-862.
    4. ten Brink, Tobias, 2010. "Strukturmerkmale des chinesischen Kapitalismus," MPIfG Discussion Paper 10/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    5. Fritz, Martin & Koch, Max, 2014. "Potentials for prosperity without growth: Ecological sustainability, social inclusion and the quality of life in 38 countries," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 191-199.
    6. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2016. "Decline and Growth in Transition Economies: A Meta-Analysis," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-9, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    7. Karen Macours & Johan Swinnen, 2006. "Rural Poverty in Transition Countries," LICOS Discussion Papers 16906, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    8. Rachael Gibson & Harald Bathelt, 2014. "Proximity relations and global knowledge flows: specialization and diffusion processes across capitalist varieties," Chapters, in: André Torre & Frédéric Wallet (ed.), Regional Development and Proximity Relations, chapter 9, pages 291-314, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Peter F. Orazem & Milan Vodopivec, 2009. "Do Market Pressures Induce Economic Efficiency? The Case of Slovenian Manufacturing, 1994–2001," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 553-576, October.
    10. Bridget O'Laughlin, 2008. "Forum 2008," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 39(6), pages 945-957, November.
    11. Leonardo Becchetti & Rocco Ciciretti & Pierluigi Conzo, 2020. "Legal Origins and Corporate Social Responsibility," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(7), pages 1-34, March.
    12. Marcello Signorelli & Enrico Marelli, 2007. "Institutional change, regional features and aggregate performance in eight EU’s transition countries," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 37/2007, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    13. Weiping Liu & Jiatao Li, 2019. "Unbalanced Institutions in Market Transition: How Do They Matter for Firm Strategic Choices and Performance in Emerging Economies?," Management International Review, Springer, vol. 59(5), pages 675-702, October.
    14. Jonnergård Karin & Larsson-Olaison Ulf, 2018. "Doxa of Shareholders and Owners: On the Threshold of Financialization," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-18, December.
    15. David Aristei & Cristiano Perugini, 2014. "Speed and Sequencing of Transition Reforms and Income Inequality: A Panel Data Analysis," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 542-570, September.
    16. Cognard, Étienne, 2013. "Intégration européenne et déclin du néo-corporatisme. Un renversement de perspective à la lumière des accords collectifs sur la formation continue," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 14.
    17. Ashby H. B. Monk, 2008. "The Knot of Contracts: The Corporate Geography of Legacy Costs," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 84(2), pages 211-235, April.
    18. Carney, Michael & Shapiro, Daniel & Estrin, Saul & Zhixiang, Liang, 2018. "National institutional systems, foreign ownership and firm performance: the case of understudied countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 87042, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    19. Jens Holscher & Cristiano Perugini & Fabrizio Pompei, 2011. "Wage inequality, labour market flexibility and duality in Eastern and Western Europe," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 271-310.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:jeciss:v:43:y:2009:i:3:p:733-758. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/MJEI20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.