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Inequality, democracy and taxation: lessons from the post-communist transition

Listed author(s):
  • Christopher Gerry

    ()

    (UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies)

  • Tomasz Marek Mickiewicz

    ()

    (UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies)

Using data for post-communist economies (1989-2002), we examine the determinants of income inequality. We find a strong positive association between equality and tax collection but note that this relationship is significantly stronger under authoritarian regimes than under democracies. We also discover that early macroeconomic stabilisation resulted in lower inequality; we confirm that education fosters equality and find that larger countries are prone to higher levels of inequality.

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File URL: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1381924/1/1381924.pdf
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Paper provided by UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) in its series UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series with number 74.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2007
Publication status: Published in Europe-Asia Studies , 60 (1) 89 - 111. 10.1080/09668130701760356.
Handle: RePEc:see:wpaper:74
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