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Inequality and reforms in transition countries

Listed author(s):
  • Aristei, David
  • Perugini, Cristiano

Distributional patterns evolved quite differently and stabilized at diversified levels across the Central–Eastern European and former Soviet Union countries which underwent transition. In this paper we provide an overview of income inequality dynamics for 22 transition countries from 1989 to 2008 and of the explanations and interpretations proposed by the main literature. We then highlight that while the effects of different transition approaches on output dynamics and other macroeconomic aggregates have been largely analysed, scarce attention has been devoted so far to their impact on distributive patterns. However, this kind of analysis might usefully contribute to complete the complex picture of the many social, economic and structural factors affected by transition and provide useful policy insights for those countries still experiencing deep institutional change.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0939362511000604
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Systems.

Volume (Year): 36 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 2-10

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:36:y:2012:i:1:p:2-10
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecosys.2011.09.001
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