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The Distribution of Wages in Belarus

  • Francesco Pastore


    (Seconda Universit� di Napoli, Piazza Matteotti 81055, Santa Maria Capua Vetere (Caserta), Italy.)

  • Alina Verashchagina

    (Belarusian National Technical University, Belarus)

This paper uncovers evidence on the distribution of wages in Belarus in the second half of the 1990s. The returns to education and work experience are high and stable. While the former is a typical finding of transition studies, the latter is not. This might be due to the pervasive role of the state in fixing wages in the dominant budget sector, rather than to market forces coming into play. Women experience a small, though largely unexplained wage gap coupled with higher than average returns to education. A wage curve effect is found, which is similar in size to that of other transition countries, but much higher than in market economies. Comparative Economic Studies (2006) 48, 351–376. doi:10.1057/palgrave.ces.8100071

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Article provided by Palgrave Macmillan in its journal Comparative Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 48 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 351-376

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Handle: RePEc:pal:compes:v:48:y:2006:i:2:p:351-376
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