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Gender Effects of Transition: The Kyrgyz Republic

  • Kathryn Anderson
  • Richard Pomfret


    (School of Economics, University of Adelaide)

Gender changes in the workplace during the transition from central planning are analyzed using household survey data from the Kyrgyz Republic. As the labor market became more market-driven between 1993 and 1997, mean differences by gender in labor force participation (LFP), monthly compensation and hourly wage all narrowed. We also observe gender differences in educational attainment, labor force status, occupation and industry. Probit analysis indicates that LFP is especially high, and increasing, for college-educated women, while married women with young children are less likely to be in the workforce. Analysis of hours worked indicates significant but declining gender differences in 1993 and 1997. Earnings regressions have greater explanatory power than the hours worked model, with wage differentials generally widening between 1993 and 1997, but the gender wage gap narrows. Better-educated female white-collar workers have been the big gainers during transition, with a relatively small decline in hours worked and relatively large increase in wages.

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Paper provided by University of Adelaide, School of Economics in its series School of Economics Working Papers with number 2000-08.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2000-08
Contact details of provider: Postal: Adelaide SA 5005
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