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Andrew J. Hill

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:J.
Last Name:Hill
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phi181
http://sites.google.com/site/andrewhillecon/

Affiliation

Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics
Montana State University-Bozeman

Bozeman, Montana (United States)
http://www.montana.edu/econ/

: (406) 994-3701
(406) 994-4838
306 Linfield Hall, Bozeman, MT 59715-0292
RePEc:edi:damtsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Fortin, Nicole M. & Hill, Andrew J. & Huang, Jeff, 2013. "Superstition in the Housing Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7484, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Johannes W. Fedderke & Andrew J Hill, 2006. "Industry Structure and Labour Market Flexibility in the South African Manufacturing Sector: A Time Series and Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 43, Economic Research Southern Africa.

Articles

  1. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "State affirmative action bans and STEM degree completions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 31-40.
  2. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.
  3. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2017. "Does partisan affiliation impact the distribution of spending? Evidence from state governments’ expenditures on education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 58-77.
  4. Andrew J. Hill, 2015. "The Girl Next Door: The Effect of Opposite Gender Friends on High School Achievement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 147-177, July.
  5. Nicole M. Fortin & Andrew J. Hill & Jeff Huang, 2014. "Superstition In The Housing Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 974-993, July.
  6. Hill, Andrew J., 2014. "The costs of failure: Negative externalities in high school course repetition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 91-105.
  7. Fedderke, Johannes W. & Hill, Andrew J., 2011. "Industry structure and labor market flexibility in the South African manufacturing sector: A time series and panel data approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1291-1302, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Fortin, Nicole M. & Hill, Andrew J. & Huang, Jeff, 2013. "Superstition in the Housing Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7484, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Jan Fidrmuc & J. D. Tena, 2014. "Friday the 13th: The Empirics of Bad Luck," CESifo Working Paper Series 5026, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. James E. Larsen, 2015. "Triskaidekaphobia and North American Residential Real Estate Prices," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(3), pages 317-329.
    3. Almond, Douglas & Chee, Christine Pal & Sviatschi, Maria Micaela & Zhong, Nan, 2015. "Auspicious birth dates among Chinese in California," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 153-159.
    4. Evgeny A. Antipov & Elena B. Pokryshevskaya, 2015. "Are buyers of apartments superstitious? Evidence from the Russian real estate market," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(6), pages 590-592, November.
    5. Brad R. Humphreys & Adam Nowak & Yang Zhou, 2016. "Cultural Superstitions and Residential Real Estate Prices: Transaction-level Evidence from the US Housing Market," Working Papers 16-27, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    6. Tong V. Wang & Rogier J. D. Potter van Loon & Martijn J. van den Assem & Dennie van Dolder, 2016. "Number preferences in lotteries," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 11(3), pages 243-259, May.
    7. Ke, Wen-Chyan & Chen, Hueiling & Lin, Hsiou-Wei W. & Liu, Yo-Chia, 2017. "The impact of numerical superstition on the final digit of stock price," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 145-157.
    8. Elena B. Pokryshevskaya & Evgeny A. Antipov, 2015. "A study of numerological superstitions in the apartments market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 83-88.
    9. Vladimir A. Pastukhov & Nikolay S. Kliman & Dmitry S. Alekseev, 2018. "Tendencies of Interaction between Russian Universities and Companies Implementing Innovative Development Programs," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1), pages 686-707.

  2. Johannes W. Fedderke & Andrew J Hill, 2006. "Industry Structure and Labour Market Flexibility in the South African Manufacturing Sector: A Time Series and Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 43, Economic Research Southern Africa.

    Cited by:

    1. Rankin Neil & Burger Rulof & Kreuser Friedrich, 2015. "The elasticity of substitution and labour-displacing technical change in post-apartheid South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 101, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Gupta, Rangan & Steinbach, Rudi, 2013. "A DSGE-VAR model for forecasting key South African macroeconomic variables," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 19-33.
    3. Johannes Fedderke, 2012. "The Cost of Rigidity: The Case of the South African Labor Market," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(4), pages 809-842, December.
    4. Johannes W. Fedderke & Daniel K. Mengisteab, 2017. "Estimating South Africa's Output Gap and Potential Growth Rate," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(2), pages 161-177, June.

Articles

  1. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.

    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2017. "Do Migrant Students Affect Local Students' Academic Achievements in Urban China?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 130, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Anne Ardila Brenøe & Ulf Zölitz, 2018. "Exposure to more female peers widens the gender gap in STEM participation," ECON - Working Papers 285, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Mouganie, Pierre & Wang, Yaojing, 2017. "High Performing Peers and Female STEM Choices in School," MPRA Paper 81860, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2017. "Does partisan affiliation impact the distribution of spending? Evidence from state governments’ expenditures on education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 58-77.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.

  3. Andrew J. Hill, 2015. "The Girl Next Door: The Effect of Opposite Gender Friends on High School Achievement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 147-177, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Merlino, Luca Paolo & Steinhardt, Max F. & Wren-Lewis, Liam, 2016. "More than Just Friends? School Peers and Adult Interracial Relationships," IZA Discussion Papers 10319, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Anne Ardila Brenøe & Ulf Zölitz, 2018. "Exposure to more female peers widens the gender gap in STEM participation," ECON - Working Papers 285, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.
    4. Laura Cyron & Guido Schwerdt & Martina Viarengo, 2017. "The effect of opposite sex siblings on cognitive and noncognitive skills in early childhood," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(19), pages 1369-1373, November.
    5. Hu, Feng, 2015. "Do girl peers improve your academic performance?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 54-58.
    6. Oleg V. Poldin & Tania P. Simoes & Marcelo Knobel & Maria M. Yudkevich, 2015. "Estimation of Peer Effects with Predicted Social Ties: Evidence from Two Universities in Brazil and Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 30/EDU/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

  4. Nicole M. Fortin & Andrew J. Hill & Jeff Huang, 2014. "Superstition In The Housing Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 974-993, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Fedderke, Johannes W. & Hill, Andrew J., 2011. "Industry structure and labor market flexibility in the South African manufacturing sector: A time series and panel data approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1291-1302, May. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-07-20
  2. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2013-07-20
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-07-20

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