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Andrew J. Hill

Not to be confused with: Andrew T. Hill

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:J.
Last Name:Hill
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phi181
http://sites.google.com/site/andrewhillecon/

Affiliation

Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics
Montana State University-Bozeman

Bozeman, Montana (United States)
http://www.montana.edu/econ/
RePEc:edi:damtsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Fortin, Nicole M. & Hill, Andrew J. & Huang, Jeff, 2013. "Superstition in the Housing Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7484, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Johannes W. Fedderke & Andrew J Hill, 2006. "Industry Structure and Labour Market Flexibility in the South African Manufacturing Sector: A Time Series and Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 43, Economic Research Southern Africa.

Articles

  1. Andrew J. Hill & Daniel B. Jones, 2020. "The Impacts of Performance Pay on Teacher Effectiveness and Retention: Does Teacher Gender Matter?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(1), pages 349-385.
  2. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2018. "A teacher who knows me: The academic benefits of repeat student-teacher matches," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-12.
  3. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "State affirmative action bans and STEM degree completions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 31-40.
  4. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.
  5. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2017. "Does partisan affiliation impact the distribution of spending? Evidence from state governments’ expenditures on education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 58-77.
  6. Andrew J. Hill, 2015. "The Girl Next Door: The Effect of Opposite Gender Friends on High School Achievement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 147-177, July.
  7. Nicole M. Fortin & Andrew J. Hill & Jeff Huang, 2014. "Superstition In The Housing Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 974-993, July.
  8. Hill, Andrew J., 2014. "The costs of failure: Negative externalities in high school course repetition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 91-105.
  9. Fedderke, Johannes W. & Hill, Andrew J., 2011. "Industry structure and labor market flexibility in the South African manufacturing sector: A time series and panel data approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1291-1302, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Fortin, Nicole M. & Hill, Andrew J. & Huang, Jeff, 2013. "Superstition in the Housing Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7484, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Halla, Martin & Liu, Chia-Lun & Liu, Jin-Tan, 2019. "The Effect of Superstition on Health: Evidence from the Taiwanese Ghost Month," IZA Discussion Papers 12066, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Invernizzi, Giovanna M. & Miller, Joshua B. & Coen, Tommaso & Dufwenberg, Martin & Oliveira, Luiz Edgard R., 2021. "Tra i Leoni: Revealing the preferences behind a superstition," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).
    3. Brad R. Humphreys & Adam Nowak & Yang Zhou, 2017. "Chinese Superstition and Real Estate Prices: Transaction-level Evidence from the US Housing Market," Working Papers 17-18, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Elena B. Pokryshevskaya & Evgeny A. Antipov, 2015. "A study of numerological superstitions in the apartments market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(1), pages 83-88.
    5. Utpal Bhattacharya & Wei-Yu Kuo & Tse-Chun Lin & Jing Zhao, 2018. "Do Superstitious Traders Lose Money?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 64(8), pages 3772-3791, August.
    6. Tao Chen, 2018. "Dragon CEOs and Firm Value," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(3), pages 382-395, September.
    7. Dmitry Burakov, 2018. "Do discounts mitigate numerological superstitions? Evidence from the Russian real estate market," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 13(5), pages 467-470, September.
    8. Jan Fidrmuc & J. D. Tena, 2014. "Friday the 13th: The Empirics of Bad Luck," CESifo Working Paper Series 5026, CESifo.
    9. James E. Larsen, 2015. "Triskaidekaphobia and North American Residential Real Estate Prices," International Real Estate Review, Global Social Science Institute, vol. 18(3), pages 317-329.
    10. Cheng Huang & Xiaojing Ma & Shiying Zhang & Qingguo Zhao, 2020. "Numerological preferences, timing of births and the long-term effect on schooling," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(2), pages 531-554, April.
    11. Almond, Douglas & Chee, Christine Pal & Sviatschi, Maria Micaela & Zhong, Nan, 2015. "Auspicious birth dates among Chinese in California," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 153-159.
    12. Evgeny A. Antipov & Elena B. Pokryshevskaya, 2015. "Are buyers of apartments superstitious? Evidence from the Russian real estate market," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(6), pages 590-592, November.
    13. Brad R. Humphreys & Adam Nowak & Yang Zhou, 2016. "Cultural Superstitions and Residential Real Estate Prices: Transaction-level Evidence from the US Housing Market," Working Papers 16-27, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    14. Wen-Chieh Wu & Yu-Chun Ma & Steven C. Bourassa, 2018. "Folk Customs and Home Improvement Decisions," International Real Estate Review, Global Social Science Institute, vol. 21(3), pages 317-341.
    15. Jia He & Haoming Liu & Tien Foo Sing & Changcheng Song & Wei-Kang Wong, 2020. "Superstition, Conspicuous Spending, and Housing Market: Evidence from Singapore," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(2), pages 783-804, February.
    16. Tong V. Wang & Rogier J. D. Potter van Loon & Martijn J. van den Assem & Dennie van Dolder, 2016. "Number preferences in lotteries," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 11(3), pages 243-259, May.
    17. Ke, Wen-Chyan & Chen, Hueiling & Lin, Hsiou-Wei W. & Liu, Yo-Chia, 2017. "The impact of numerical superstition on the final digit of stock price," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 145-157.
    18. Woei-Chyuan Wong & Nur Adiana Hiau Abdullah & Hock-Eam Lim, 2019. "The Value Of Chinese Superstitions In Malaysia: Evidence From Car Plate Auctioning," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 64(01), pages 115-137, March.
    19. Bai, Min & Xu, Limin & Yu, Chia-Feng (Jeffrey) & Zurbruegg, Ralf, 2020. "Superstition and stock price crash risk," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    20. Vladimir A. Pastukhov & Nikolay S. Kliman & Dmitry S. Alekseev, 2018. "Tendencies of Interaction between Russian Universities and Companies Implementing Innovative Development Programs," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1), pages 686-707.
    21. Tao Chen & Andreas Karathanasopoulos & Stanley Iat-Meng Ko & Chia Chun Lo, 2020. "Lucky lots and unlucky investors," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 54(2), pages 735-751, February.

  2. Johannes W. Fedderke & Andrew J Hill, 2006. "Industry Structure and Labour Market Flexibility in the South African Manufacturing Sector: A Time Series and Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 43, Economic Research Southern Africa.

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Fedderke & Nonso Obikili & Nicola Viegi, 2018. "Markups and Concentration in South African Manufacturing Sectors: An Analysis with Administrative Data," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 86(S1), pages 120-140, January.
    2. Friedrich Kreuser & Rulof Burger & Neil Rankin, 2015. "The elasticity of substitution and labour-displacing technical change in post-apartheid South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-101, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Gupta, Rangan & Steinbach, Rudi, 2013. "A DSGE-VAR model for forecasting key South African macroeconomic variables," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 19-33.
    4. Erten, Bilge & Leight, Jessica & Tregenna, Fiona, 2019. "Trade liberalization and local labor market adjustment in South Africa," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 448-467.
    5. Johannes Fedderke, 2012. "The Cost of Rigidity: The Case of the South African Labor Market," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(4), pages 809-842, December.
    6. Joshua Budlender, 2019. "Markups and market structure in South Africa: What can be learnt from new administrative data?," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-58, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Johannes Fedderke & Daniel Mengisteab, 2016. "Estimating South Africas output gap and potential growth rate," Working Papers 7191, South African Reserve Bank.

Articles

  1. Andrew J. Hill & Daniel B. Jones, 2020. "The Impacts of Performance Pay on Teacher Effectiveness and Retention: Does Teacher Gender Matter?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(1), pages 349-385.

    Cited by:

    1. Alexandra E. Hill & Jesse Burkhardt, 2021. "Peers in the Field: The Role of Ability and Gender in Peer Effects among Agricultural Workers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 103(3), pages 790-811, May.
    2. Biasi, Barbara & Sarsons, Heather, 2020. "Flexible Wages, Bargaining, and the Gender Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 13754, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Gershenson, Seth, 2021. "Identifying and Producing Effective Teachers," IZA Discussion Papers 14096, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  2. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2018. "A teacher who knows me: The academic benefits of repeat student-teacher matches," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-12.

    Cited by:

    1. Chris Birdsall & Seth Gershenson & Raymond Zuniga, 2020. "The Effects of Demographic Mismatch in an Elite Professional School Setting," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 15(3), pages 457-486, Summer.
    2. Javaeria Qureshi & Ben Ost, 2019. "Does Teacher‐Family Experience Affect Test Scores?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(3), pages 509-523, July.

  3. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "State affirmative action bans and STEM degree completions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 31-40.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Hinrichs, 2020. "Affirmative Action and Racial Segregation," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(2), pages 239-267.
    2. Vieira, Renato Schwambach & Arends-Kuenning, Mary, 2019. "Affirmative action in Brazilian universities: Effects on the enrollment of targeted groups," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    3. Bleemer, Zachary, 2020. "Affirmative Action, Mismatch, and Economic Mobility After California’s Proposition 209," University of California at Berkeley, Center for Studies in Higher Education qt2w21n06w, Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley.

  4. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.

    Cited by:

    1. Brenøe, Anne & Zölitz, Ulf, 2019. "Exposure to More Female Peers Widens the Gender Gap in STEM Participation," CEPR Discussion Papers 13966, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Griffith, Amanda L. & Main, Joyce B., 2019. "First impressions in the classroom: How do class characteristics affect student grades and majors?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 125-137.
    3. Zoë B. Cullen & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2019. "The Old Boys' Club: Schmoozing and the Gender Gap," NBER Working Papers 26530, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Delaney, Judith & Devereux, Paul J., 2021. "Gender and Educational Achievement: Stylized Facts and Causal Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 15753, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Mouganie, Pierre & Wang, Yaojing, 2019. "High-Performing Peers and Female STEM Choices in School," IZA Discussion Papers 12455, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Damiano Pregaldini & Uschi Backes-Gellner & Gerald Eisenkopf, 2018. "Girls' preferences for STEM and the effects of classroom gender composition: new evidence from a natural experiment," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0152, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Jul 2020.
    7. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2017. "Do Migrant Students Affect Local Students' Academic Achievements in Urban China?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 130, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    8. Stoddard, Olga B. & Karpowitz, Christopher F. & Preece, Jessica, 2020. "Strength in Numbers: A Field Experiment in Gender, Influence, and Group Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 13741, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Schiltz, Fritz & Mazrekaj, Deni & Horn, Daniel & De Witte, Kristof, 2019. "Does it matter when your smartest peers leave your class? Evidence from Hungary," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 79-91.

  5. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2017. "Does partisan affiliation impact the distribution of spending? Evidence from state governments’ expenditures on education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 58-77.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.
    2. Lahoti, Rahul & Sahoo, Soham, 2020. "Are educated leaders good for education? Evidence from India," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 42-62.
    3. James Alm & Trey Dronyk-Trosper & Sean Larkin, 2020. "In the Land of OZ: Designating Opportunity Zones," Working Papers 2006, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    4. , 2020. "Partisanship and Fiscal Policy in Economic Unions: Evidence from U.S. States," Working Papers 20-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    5. Fidel Perez-Sebastian & Ohad Raveh, 2019. "Federal tax policies, congressional voting and natural resources," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(3), pages 1112-1164, August.
    6. James Gerard Caillier, 2020. "Bureaucratic Bashing and Praising: What Effect Does it Have on the Performance Citizens Assign Agencies?," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 685-701, December.
    7. Niklas Potrafke, 2017. "Government Ideology and Economic Policy-Making in the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 6444, CESifo.
    8. Eamon McGinn & Shiko Maruyama, 2021. "Why Waste Your Vote? Informal Voting in Compulsory Elections in Australia," Working Paper Series 2021/02, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    9. Benoît Le Maux & Kristýna Dostálová & Fabio Padovano, 2020. "Ideology or voters? A quasi-experimental test of why left-wing governments spend more," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 182(1), pages 17-48, January.

  6. Andrew J. Hill, 2015. "The Girl Next Door: The Effect of Opposite Gender Friends on High School Achievement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 147-177, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Brenøe, Anne & Zölitz, Ulf, 2019. "Exposure to More Female Peers Widens the Gender Gap in STEM Participation," CEPR Discussion Papers 13966, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Getik, Demid & Meier, Armando N., 2020. "Peer Gender and Mental Health," Working papers 2020/15, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    3. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.
    4. Laura Cyron & Guido Schwerdt & Martina Viarengo, 2017. "The effect of opposite sex siblings on cognitive and noncognitive skills in early childhood," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(19), pages 1369-1373, November.
    5. Caetano, Gregorio & Maheshri, Vikram, 2019. "Gender segregation within neighborhoods," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 253-263.
    6. Martin, Darius D. & Wright, Adam C. & Krieg, John M., 2020. "Social networks and college performance: Evidence from dining data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    7. Luca Paolo Merlino & Max Friedrich Steinhardt & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2019. "More than just friends? School peers and adult interracial relationships," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) halshs-02087855, HAL.
    8. Kelly Foley, 2019. "The gender gap in university enrolment: Do parents play a role beyond investing in skills?," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 52(2), pages 441-489, May.
    9. Kiss David, 2017. "A Model about the Impact of Ability Grouping on Student Achievement," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(3), pages 1-10, July.
    10. Díaz, Carlos & Patacchini, Eleonora, 2020. "Parents, Neighbors and Youth Crime," IZA Discussion Papers 13906, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Christian Dustmann & Hyejin Ku & Do Won Kwak, 2017. "Why Are Single-Sex Schools Successful?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6535, CESifo.
    12. Hu, Feng, 2015. "Do girl peers improve your academic performance?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 54-58.
    13. Oleg V. Poldin & Tania P. Simoes & Marcelo Knobel & Maria M. Yudkevich, 2015. "Estimation of Peer Effects with Predicted Social Ties: Evidence from Two Universities in Brazil and Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 30/EDU/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

  7. Nicole M. Fortin & Andrew J. Hill & Jeff Huang, 2014. "Superstition In The Housing Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(3), pages 974-993, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Hill, Andrew J., 2014. "The costs of failure: Negative externalities in high school course repetition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 91-105.

    Cited by:

    1. Méndez-Errico, Luciana & Ramos, Xavier, 2019. "Selection and Educational Attainment: Why Some Children Are Left Behind? Evidence from a Middle-Income Country," IZA Discussion Papers 12118, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Ferreira Sequeda, Maria & Golsteyn, Bart & Parra Cely, Sergio, 2018. "The Effect of Grade Retention on Secondary School Performance: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," Research Memorandum 018, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    3. Zhao, Liqiu & Zhao, Zhong, 2021. "Disruptive Peers in the Classroom and Students’ Academic Outcomes: Evidence and Mechanisms," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    4. Hill, Andrew J. & Jones, Daniel B., 2018. "A teacher who knows me: The academic benefits of repeat student-teacher matches," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-12.

  9. Fedderke, Johannes W. & Hill, Andrew J., 2011. "Industry structure and labor market flexibility in the South African manufacturing sector: A time series and panel data approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1291-1302, May. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-07-20
  2. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2013-07-20
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-07-20

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