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Comparative sustainable development in sub‐Saharan Africa

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  • Simplice A. Asongu

Abstract

Motivated by sustainable development challenges in sub‐Saharan Africa, this study assesses the comparative persistence of environmental unsustainability in a sample of 44 countries in the subregion for the period 2000–2012. The empirical evidence is based on Generalized Method of Moments. Of the six hypotheses tested, it is not feasible to assess the hypothesis on resource‐wealth because of issues in the degrees of freedom. For the remaining hypotheses, the following findings are established. (i) Hypothesis 1 postulating that middle‐income countries have a lower level of persistence in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is valid for CO2 per‐capita emissions, CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production and CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption. (ii) Hypothesis 2 that countries on the edge of French civil law is valid for CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption and CO2 intensity, but not for CO2 per‐capita emissions. (iii) Hypothesis 3 on the postulation that politically unstable countries reflect more persistence is valid for CO2 per‐capita emissions. (iv) Hypothesis 5 on the propensity for landlocked countries to be associated with more persistence in CO2 emissions is valid for CO2 per‐capita emissions but not for CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption. (v) Hypothesis 6 maintaining that Christianity‐dominated countries are more environmentally friendly with regard to CO2 emissions is valid for CO2 per‐capita emissions but not for CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption and CO2 intensity. Implications for policy and theory are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Simplice A. Asongu, 2018. "Comparative sustainable development in sub‐Saharan Africa," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(6), pages 638-651, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:sustdv:v:26:y:2018:i:6:p:638-651
    DOI: 10.1002/sd.1733
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    1. Asongu, Simplice A. & Orim, Stella-Maris I. & Nting, Rexon T., 2019. "Inequality, information technology and inclusive education in sub-Saharan Africa," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 380-389.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "How enhancing information and communication technology has affected inequality in Africa for sustainable development: An empirical investigation," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 647-656, July.
    3. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nnanna, Joseph & Acha-Anyi, Paul N., 2020. "Finance, inequality and inclusive education in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 162-177.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Boosting quality education with inclusive human development: empirical evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," CEREDEC Working Papers 19/017, Centre de Recherche pour le Développement Economique (CEREDEC).
    5. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nnanna, Joseph & Acha-Anyi, Paul N., 2020. "Inequality and gender economic inclusion: The moderating role of financial access in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 173-185.
    6. Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2020. "Financial Access, Governance and the Persistence of Inequality in Africa: Mechanisms and Policy instruments," Working Papers 20/027, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).

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    JEL classification:

    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • P37 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Legal

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