IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eneeco/v30y2008i5p2391-2400.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from 11 Sub-Sahara African countries

Author

Listed:
  • Akinlo, A.E.

Abstract

The paper examines the causal relationship between energy consumption and economic growth for eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Using the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds test, the study finds that energy consumption is cointegrated with economic growth in Cameroon, Cote D'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Senegal, Sudan and Zimbabwe. Moreover, this test suggests that energy consumption has a significant positive long run impact on economic growth in Ghana, Kenya, Senegal and Sudan. Granger causality test based on vector error correction model (VECM) shows bi-directional relationship between energy consumption and economic growth for Gambia, Ghana and Senegal. However, Granger causality test shows that economic growth Granger causes energy consumption in Sudan and Zimbabwe. The neutrality hypothesis is confirmed in respect of Cameroon and Cote D'Ivoire. The same result of no causality was found for Nigeria, Kenya and Togo. The result shows that each country should formulate appropriate energy conservation policies taking into cognizance of her peculiar condition.

Suggested Citation

  • Akinlo, A.E., 2008. "Energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from 11 Sub-Sahara African countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2391-2400, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:5:p:2391-2400
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140-9883(08)00025-X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2006. "Electricity consumption and economic growth: a time series experience for 17 African countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1106-1114, July.
    2. Erol, Umit & Yu, Eden S. H., 1987. "Time series analysis of the causal relationships between U.S. energy and employment," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 75-89, June.
    3. Ebohon, Obas John, 1996. "Energy, economic growth and causality in developing countries : A case study of Tanzania and Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 447-453, May.
    4. Kremers, Jeroen J M & Ericsson, Neil R & Dolado, Juan J, 1992. "The Power of Cointegration Tests," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(3), pages 325-348, August.
    5. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1996. "Energy consumption, real income and temporal causality: results from a multi-country study based on cointegration and error-correction modelling techniques," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 165-183, July.
    6. Glasure, Yong U. & Lee, Aie-Rie, 1998. "Cointegration, error-correction, and the relationship between GDP and energy: The case of South Korea and Singapore," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 17-25, March.
    7. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "The saving and investment nexus for China: evidence from cointegration tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 1979-1990.
    8. Hondroyiannis, George & Lolos, Sarantis & Papapetrou, Evangelia, 2002. "Energy consumption and economic growth: assessing the evidence from Greece," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 319-336, July.
    9. Akarca, Ali T. & Long, Thomas II, 1979. "Energy and employment: a time-series analysis of the causal relationship," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 2(2-3), pages 151-162.
    10. Yu, Eden S. H. & Hwang, Been-Kwei, 1984. "The relationship between energy and GNP : Further results," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 186-190, July.
    11. Asafu-Adjaye, John, 2000. "The relationship between energy consumption, energy prices and economic growth: time series evidence from Asian developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 615-625, December.
    12. Glasure, Yong U., 2002. "Energy and national income in Korea: further evidence on the role of omitted variables," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 355-365, July.
    13. Won-Young Lee, 1997. "The Case of Korea," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Peter J. Buckley & Jaime Campos & Hafiz Mirza & Eduardo White (ed.), International Technology Transfer by Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises, chapter 14, pages 406-431, Palgrave Macmillan.
    14. Tsangyao Chang & Yuan-Hong Ho & Chiung-Ju Huang, 2005. "A Reexamination Of South Korea¡¯S Aggregate Import Demand Function: The Bounds Test Analysis," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 119-128, June.
    15. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    16. Paresh Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Economic Growth in Fiji. An Empirical Assessment Using the ARDL Approach," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 96-115.
    17. Akinlo, A. Enisan, 2006. "The stability of money demand in Nigeria: An autoregressive distributed lag approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 445-452, May.
    18. Yu, Eden S. H. & Jin, Jang C., 1992. "Cointegration tests of energy consumption, income, and employment," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 259-266, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2010. "A literature survey on energy-growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 340-349, January.
    2. Jaruwan Chontanawat & Lester C Hunt & Richard Pierse, 2006. "Causality between Energy Consumption and GDP: Evidence from 30 OECD and 78 Non-OECD Countries," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 113, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    3. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2010. "Energy consumption, prices and economic growth in three SSA countries: A comparative study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2463-2469, May.
    4. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Salah Uddin, Gazi & Ur Rehman, Ijaz & Imran, Kashif, 2014. "Industrialization, electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in Bangladesh," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 575-586.
    5. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Patel, Arvind & Kumar, Nikeel, 2017. "The effect of energy on output per worker in the Balkan Peninsula: A country-specific study of 12 nations in the Energy Community," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1223-1239.
    6. Ouédraogo, Idrissa M., 2010. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in Burkina Faso: A cointegration analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 524-531, May.
    7. Huang, Bwo-Nung & Hwang, M.J. & Yang, C.W., 2008. "Causal relationship between energy consumption and GDP growth revisited: A dynamic panel data approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 41-54, August.
    8. Chor Foon Tang and Eu Chye Tan, 2012. "Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth in Portugal: Evidence from a Multivariate Framework Analysis," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    9. Amiri, Arshia & Zibaei, Mansour, 2012. "Granger causality between energy use and economic growth in France with using geostatistical models," MPRA Paper 36357, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Ronald Kumar & Peter Stauvermann & Arvind Patel, 2015. "Nexus between electricity consumption and economic growth: a study of Gibraltar," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 119-135, May.
    11. Paul, Biru Paksha & Uddin, Gazi Salah, 2011. "Energy and output dynamics in Bangladesh," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 480-487, May.
    12. Farzana Sharmin & Mohammed Robayet Khan & Mohammed Robayet Khan, 2016. "A Causal Relationship between Energy Consumption, Energy Prices and Economic Growth in Africa," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 477-494.
    13. Hatemi-J, Abdulnasser & Uddin, Gazi Salah, 2012. "Is the causal nexus of energy utilization and economic growth asymmetric in the US?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 461-469.
    14. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2011. "Energy consumption and aggregate income in Italy: cointegration and causality analysis," MPRA Paper 28494, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Rashid, Abdul & Kandemir, Ӧzge, 2016. "Variations in energy use and output growth dynamics: An assessment for intertemporal and contemporaneous relationship," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 388-396.
    16. Araç, Ayşen & Hasanov, Mübariz, 2014. "Asymmetries in the dynamic interrelationship between energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from Turkey," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 259-269.
    17. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mete Feridun, 2012. "Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 46(5), pages 1583-1599, August.
    18. Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Refk SELMI & Ilhan OZTURK, 2014. "The Nexus between Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth: New Insights from Meta-Analysis," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 4(4), pages 621-635.
    19. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Kumar, Radika, 2013. "Effects of energy consumption on per worker output: A study of Kenya and South Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1187-1193.
    20. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Loganathan, Nanthakumar & Kumar, Radika Devi, 2015. "Exploring the role of energy, trade and financial development in explaining economic growth in South Africa: A revisit," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1300-1311.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:5:p:2391-2400. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.