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Trade Liberalization and Economic Growth in Fiji. An Empirical Assessment Using the ARDL Approach

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  • Paresh Narayan
  • Russell Smyth

Abstract

This study investigates the effect of trade liberalization on economic performance in Fiji using a Cobb–Douglas production function, which is expanded to take into account political instability and trade liberalization. The long run results conform to theoretical expectations, except for the contribution of labour force, which is negatively related to real Gross Domestic Product. We attribute this to the rapid and consistent emigration of skilled labour following the 1987 coups. While human capital was found to be the most influential variable, exports and investment were found to be weakly related to Gross Domestic Product. The key finding is that the dummy variable for signing the IMF agreement in 1984 had a statistically significant positive effect on real Gross Domestic Product in the long run, but the short run effects of signing the agreement as well as the short run and long run effects of implementing the agreement in 1986 were statistically insignificant.

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  • Paresh Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Economic Growth in Fiji. An Empirical Assessment Using the ARDL Approach," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 96-115.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:rjapxx:v:10:y:2005:i:1:p:96-115
    DOI: 10.1080/1354786042000309099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Seema Narayan, 2008. "Does Military Expenditure Determine Fiji'S Exploding Debt Levels?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 77-87.
    3. Shamal Shivneel Chand & Baljeet Singh & Sanjesh Kumar, 2020. "The economic burden of non-communicable disease mortality in the South Pacific: Evidence from Fiji," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(7), pages 1-18, July.
    4. Twerefou, Daniel Kwabena & Abeney, Jacob Opantu, 2020. "Efficiency of household electricity consumption in Ghana," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 144(C).
    5. Ekundayo P. Mesagan & Isaac A. Ogbuji & Yasiru O. Alimi & Anthonia T. Odeleye, 2019. "Growth Effects of Financial Market Instruments: The Ghanaian Experience," Working Papers 19/095, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    6. Eita, Joel Hinaunye & Pedro, Marcio Jose, 2020. "Modelling total factor productivity in a developing economy: evidence from Angola," MPRA Paper 101304, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Apr 2020.
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    8. Onatunji Olufemi, 2019. "Do real exchange rate changes have symmetric or asymmetric effects on trade balance in Nigeria? Evidence from Non-linear ARDL Model," The Review of Finance and Banking, Academia de Studii Economice din Bucuresti, Romania / Facultatea de Finante, Asigurari, Banci si Burse de Valori / Catedra de Finante, vol. 11(1), pages 14-23, June.
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    10. Seema Narayan & Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2010. "Estimating Import And Export Demand Elasticities For Mauritius And South Africa," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 241-252, September.
    11. Elsadig Musa Ahmed & Geeta Krishnasamy, 2012. "Telecommunications investment and economic growth in ASEAN5: An assessment from UECM," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 315-332, December.

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