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CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in Turkey

Listed author(s):
  • Ozturk, Ilhan
  • Acaravci, Ali

This paper examines the long run and causal relationship issues between economic growth, carbon emissions, energy consumption and employment ratio in Turkey by using autoregressive distributed lag bounds testing approach of cointegration. Empirical results for Turkey over the period 1968-2005 suggest an evidence of a long-run relationship between the variables at 5% significance level in Turkey. The estimated income elasticity of carbon emissions per capita is -0.606 and the income elasticity of energy consumption per capita is 1.375. Results for the existence and direction of Granger causality show that neither carbon emissions per capita nor energy consumption per capita cause real GDP per capita, but employment ratio causes real GDP per capita in the short run. In addition, EKC hypothesis at causal framework by using a linear logarithmic model is not valid in Turkish case. The overall results indicates that energy conservation policies, such as rationing energy consumption and controlling carbon dioxide emissions, are likely to have no adverse effect on the real output growth of Turkey.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.

Volume (Year): 14 (2010)
Issue (Month): 9 (December)
Pages: 3220-3225

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Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:14:y:2010:i:9:p:3220-3225
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