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Modeling climate change feedbacks and adaptation responses: recent approaches and shortcomings

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  • Karen Fisher-Vanden

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  • Ian Sue Wing
  • Elisa Lanzi
  • David Popp

Abstract

This paper offers a critical review of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts in integrated assessment have concentrated on developing baseline trajectories of emissions and mitigation scenario analyses. A key missing component in Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) is the representation of climate impacts and adaptation responses. In this paper, we identify key biases that are introduced when climate impacts and adaptation responses are omitted from the analysis and review the state of modeling studies that attempt to capture these feedbacks. A common problem in these IAM studies is the lack of connection with empirical studies. We therefore also review the state of the empirical work on climate impacts and identify ways that this connection could be improved. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Karen Fisher-Vanden & Ian Sue Wing & Elisa Lanzi & David Popp, 2013. "Modeling climate change feedbacks and adaptation responses: recent approaches and shortcomings," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 481-495, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:117:y:2013:i:3:p:481-495
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-012-0644-9
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    Cited by:

    1. Elshennawy, Abeer & Robinson, Sherman & Willenbockel, Dirk, 2016. "Climate change and economic growth: An intertemporal general equilibrium analysis for Egypt," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 681-689.
    2. Ciscar, Juan-Carlos & Dowling, Paul, 2014. "Integrated assessment of climate impacts and adaptation in the energy sector," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 531-538.
    3. Schenker, Oliver & Stephan, Gunter, 2014. "Give and take: How the funding of adaptation to climate change can improve the donor's terms-of-trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 44-55.
    4. Zimmermann, Andrea & Webber, Heidi & Zhao, Gang & Ewert, Frank & Kros, Johannes & Wolf, Joost & Britz, Wolfgang & de Vries, Wim, 2017. "Climate change impacts on crop yields, land use and environment in response to crop sowing dates and thermal time requirements," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 81-92.
    5. Gabriel Bachner & Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Nina Knittel, 2019. "How does climate change adaptation affect public budgets? Development of an assessment framework and a demonstration for Austria," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 24(7), pages 1325-1341, October.
    6. Ian Wing & Karen Fisher-Vanden, 2013. "Confronting the challenge of integrated assessment of climate adaptation: a conceptual framework," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 497-514, April.
    7. Sam Fankhauser, 2016. "Adaptation to climate change," GRI Working Papers 255, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    8. Handayani, Kamia & Filatova, Tatiana & Krozer, Yoram & Anugrah, Pinto, 2020. "Seeking for a climate change mitigation and adaptation nexus: Analysis of a long-term power system expansion," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 262(C).

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