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Economic impact of climate change: simulations with a regionalized climate-economy model

Author

Listed:
  • Deke, Oliver
  • Hooss, Kurt Georg
  • Kasten, Christiane
  • Klepper, Gernot
  • Springer, Katrin

Abstract

Climate change affects the physical and biological system in many regions of the world. The extent to which human systems will suffer economically from climate change depends on the adaptive capabilities within a region as well as across regions. We use an economic General-Equilibrium model and an Ocean-Atmosphere model in a regionally and sectorally disaggregated framework to analyze adaptation to climate change in different regions of the world. It turns out that vulnerability to climate impacts differs significantly across regions and that the overall adjustment of the economic system quite reduces the direct climate impacts.

Suggested Citation

  • Deke, Oliver & Hooss, Kurt Georg & Kasten, Christiane & Klepper, Gernot & Springer, Katrin, 2001. "Economic impact of climate change: simulations with a regionalized climate-economy model," Kiel Working Papers 1065, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:1065
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    computable general equilibrium model; integrated assessment framework; impact modelling; ocean-atmosphere model; climate change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • R53 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Public Facility Location Analysis; Public Investment and Capital Stock
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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