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Impacts of Climate Change on Residential Electricity Consumption: Evidence from Billing Data

In: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present

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  • Anin Aroonruengsawat
  • Maximilian Auffhammer

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  • Anin Aroonruengsawat & Maximilian Auffhammer, 2011. "Impacts of Climate Change on Residential Electricity Consumption: Evidence from Billing Data," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Climate Change: Adaptations Past and Present, pages 311-342, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:11991
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c11991.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Olivier Deschênes & Michael Greenstone, 2011. "Climate Change, Mortality, and Adaptation: Evidence from Annual Fluctuations in Weather in the US," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 152-185, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Blazquez Leticia & Nina Boogen & Massimo Filippini, 2012. "Residential electricity demand for Spain: new empirical evidence using aggregated data," CEPE Working paper series 12-82, CEPE Center for Energy Policy and Economics, ETH Zurich.
    2. Maximilian Auffhammer & Anin Aroonruengsawat, 2011. "Simulating the impacts of climate change, prices and population on California’s residential electricity consumption," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 109(1), pages 191-210, December.
    3. Dora L. Costa & Matthew E. Kahn, 2010. "Why Has California's Residential Electricity Consumption Been So Flat since the 1980s?: A Microeconometric Approach," NBER Working Papers 15978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fikru, Mahelet G. & Gautier, Luis, 2015. "The impact of weather variation on energy consumption in residential houses," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 19-30.
    5. Kahn, Matthew E. & Walsh, Randall, 2015. "Cities and the Environment," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.),Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 405-465, Elsevier.
    6. Deschenes, Olivier, 2014. "Temperature, human health, and adaptation: A review of the empirical literature," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 606-619.
    7. Olivier Deschênes & Michael Greenstone, 2011. "Climate Change, Mortality, and Adaptation: Evidence from Annual Fluctuations in Weather in the US," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 152-185, October.
    8. Engeland, Kolbjørn & Borga, Marco & Creutin, Jean-Dominique & François, Baptiste & Ramos, Maria-Helena & Vidal, Jean-Philippe, 2017. "Space-time variability of climate variables and intermittent renewable electricity production – A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 600-617.
    9. Rolf Golombek & Sverre Kittelsen & Ingjerd Haddeland, 2012. "Climate change: impacts on electricity markets in Western Europe," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 113(2), pages 357-370, July.
    10. Eyer, Jonathan & Wichman, Casey J., 2018. "Does water scarcity shift the electricity generation mix toward fossil fuels? Empirical evidence from the United States," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 224-241.
    11. Solomon Hsiang & Paulina Oliva & Reed Walker, 2019. "The Distribution of Environmental Damages," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(1), pages 83-103.
    12. Koichiro Ito, 2015. "Asymmetric Incentives in Subsidies: Evidence from a Large-Scale Electricity Rebate Program," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 209-237, August.
    13. Kahrl, Fredrich & Roland-Holst, David W., 2008. "Climate change risk and response," CUDARE Working Papers 46721, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    14. De Cian, Enrica & Wing, Ian Sue, 2016. "Global Energy Demand in a Warming Climate," EIA: Climate Change: Economic Impacts and Adaptation 232222, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    15. Almas Heshmati, 2014. "Demand, Customer Base-Line And Demand Response In The Electricity Market: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 862-888, December.
    16. Hyojoo Son & Changwan Kim, 2020. "A Deep Learning Approach to Forecasting Monthly Demand for Residential–Sector Electricity," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(8), pages 1-16, April.
    17. Karen Fisher-Vanden & Ian Sue Wing & Elisa Lanzi & David Popp, 2013. "Modeling climate change feedbacks and adaptation responses: recent approaches and shortcomings," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 481-495, April.
    18. Chong, Howard, 2012. "Building vintage and electricity use: Old homes use less electricity in hot weather," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(5), pages 906-930.
    19. Tatyana Deryugina & Solomon Hsiang, 2017. "The Marginal Product of Climate," NBER Working Papers 24072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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