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The cost of adapting to climate change: evidence from the US residential sector

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  • François Cohen

    (CERNA i3 - Centre d'économie industrielle i3 - MINES ParisTech - École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Matthieu Glachant

    () (CERNA i3 - Centre d'économie industrielle i3 - MINES ParisTech - École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Magnus Söderberg

    () (NIVA - Norwegian Institute for Water Research)

Abstract

Using household-level data from the American Housing Survey, this paper assesses the cost of adapting housing to temperature increases. We account for both energy use adjustments and capital adjustments through investments in weatherization and heating and cooling equipment. Our best estimate of the present discounted value of the cost for adapting to the A2 « business-as-usual » climate scenario by the end of the century is $5,600 per housing unit, including both energy and investment costs. A more intense use of air conditioners will be compensated for by a reduction in heating need, leading to a shift from gas to electricity consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • François Cohen & Matthieu Glachant & Magnus Söderberg, 2017. "The cost of adapting to climate change: evidence from the US residential sector," Working Papers hal-01695171, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01695171
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-mines-paristech.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01695171
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    Cited by:

    1. Enrica De Cian & Filippo Pavanello & Teresa Randazzo & Malcolm Mistry & Marinella Davide, 2019. "Does climate influence households’ thermal comfort decisions?," Working Papers 2019:02, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".

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