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Does climate influence households’ thermal comfort decisions?

Author

Listed:
  • Enrica De Cian

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari and CMCC)

  • Filippo Pavanello

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari)

  • Teresa Randazzo

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari)

  • Malcolm Mistry

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari and CMCC)

  • Marinella Davide

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari and CMCC)

Abstract

This paper investigates how households have been adapting to climate change through the use of two technologies important for thermal comfort, air conditioning and thermal insulation. Merging a global gridded dataset of historical temperatures with the 2011 OECD EPIC survey, we study the determinants of installing air conditioning or adopting thermal insulation in response to a warmer climate in eight countries. After controlling for a set of demographic, socio-economic and attitudinal variables, we apply a binary probit model and find that exposure to a warmer climate influences only air conditioning adoption whereas, climatic conditions seem not to affect thermal insulation decisions which, instead, mainly depends on household wealth, dwelling characteristics, age, household size and propensity to energy-saving behaviours. This study does not find any evidence of a possible joint decision for the two technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrica De Cian & Filippo Pavanello & Teresa Randazzo & Malcolm Mistry & Marinella Davide, 2019. "Does climate influence households’ thermal comfort decisions?," Working Papers 2019:02, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2019:02
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cross-section; climate change; adaptation; energy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy

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