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Effect Of Human Capital On Maize Productivity In Ghana: A Quantile Regression Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Nyamekye, Isaac
  • Fiankor, Dela-Dem Doe
  • Ntoni, Jonathan Okyere

Abstract

Agriculture continues to play an important role in the economy of most African countries. Thus, productivity growth in agriculture is necessary for economic growth and poverty reduction of the region. While, theoretically, investing in human capital improves productivity, the empirical evidence is somewhat mixed, especially in developing countries. In Ghana, maize is associated with household food security, and low-income households are considered food insecure if they have no maize in stock. But, due to low productivity, Ghanaian farmers are yet to produce enough to meet local demand. Using quantile and OLS regression techniques, this study contributes to the literature on human capital and productivity by assessing the effect of human capital (captured by education, farming experience and access to extension services) on maize productivity in Ghana. The results suggest that although human capital has no significant effect on maize yields, its effect on productivity varies across quantiles.

Suggested Citation

  • Nyamekye, Isaac & Fiankor, Dela-Dem Doe & Ntoni, Jonathan Okyere, 2016. "Effect Of Human Capital On Maize Productivity In Ghana: A Quantile Regression Approach," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 4(2), pages 1-11, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ijfaec:234914
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.234914
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/234914/files/vol4.no2.pp125.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. repec:fth:oxesaf:96-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Prabhu Pingali, 2007. "Agricultural growth and economic development: a view through the globalization lens," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 1-12, December.
    10. Simon Appleton & Arsene Balihuta, 1996. "Education and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Uganda," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 415-444.
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    13. Simon Appleton & Arsene Balihuta, 1996. "Education and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Uganda," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 415-444.
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