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The male-female gap in physician earnings: Evidence from a public health insurance system

Author

Listed:
  • Theurl, Engelbert

    () (Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck)

  • Winner, Hannes

    () (University of Salzburg)

Abstract

Empirical evidence from U.S. studies suggests that female physicians earn less than their male counterparts, on average. The earnings gap does not disappear when individual and market characteristics are controlled for. This paper investigates whether a gender earnings difference can also be observed in a health care system predominantly financed by public insurance companies. Using a unique data set of physicians’ earnings recorded by a public social security agency in an Austrian province between 2000 and 2004, we find a gender gap in average earnings of about 32 percent. A substantial share of this gap (20 to 47 percent) cannot be explained by individual and market characteristics, leaving labor market discrimination as one possible explanation for the observed gender earnings difference of physicians.

Suggested Citation

  • Theurl, Engelbert & Winner, Hannes, 2010. "The male-female gap in physician earnings: Evidence from a public health insurance system," Working Papers in Economics 2010-15, University of Salzburg.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:sbgwpe:2010_015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carmen Fernandez & Eduardo Ley & Mark F. J. Steel, 2001. "Model uncertainty in cross-country growth regressions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(5), pages 563-576.
    2. Fernandez, Carmen & Ley, Eduardo & Steel, Mark F. J., 2001. "Benchmark priors for Bayesian model averaging," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 381-427, February.
    3. Jesus Crespo Cuaresma, "undated". "Forecasting euro exchange rates: How much does model averaging help?," Working Papers 2007-24, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    4. Xavier Sala-I-Martin & Gernot Doppelhofer & Ronald I. Miller, 2004. "Determinants of Long-Term Growth: A Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates (BACE) Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 813-835, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gravelle, Hugh & Hole, Arne Risa & Santos, Rita, 2011. "Measuring and testing for gender discrimination in physician pay: English family doctors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 660-674, July.
    2. Weeks, William B. & Paraponaris, Alain & Ventelou, Bruno, 2013. "Sex-based differences in income and response to proposed financial incentives among general practitioners in France," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 199-205.
    3. Gächter, Martin & Schwazer, Peter & Theurl, Engelbert & Winner, Hannes, 2012. "Physician density in a two-tiered health care system," Health Policy, Elsevier, pages 257-268.
    4. Schurer, Stefanie & Kühnle, Daniel & Scott, Anthony & Cheng, Terence Chai, 2012. "One Man's Blessing, Another Woman's Curse? Family Factors and the Gender-Earnings Gap of Doctors," IZA Discussion Papers 7017, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Wang, Chao & Sweetman, Arthur, 2013. "Gender, family status and physician labour supply," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 17-25.
    6. repec:dau:papers:123456789/11717 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Stefanie Schurer & Daniel Kuehnle & Anthony Scott & Terence C. Cheng, 2016. "A Man's Blessing or a Woman's Curse? The Family Earnings Gap of Doctors," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 385-414, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health care financing; physician earnings; wage composition;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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