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La desindustrialización y el comercio


  • Antonio Spilimbergo


(Disponible en idioma inglés únicamente) Baumol (1967) demostró que la tasa de crecimiento de una economía decrece si un sector tiene una productividad menor que otros y la demanda entre bienes es inelástica. En este trabajo se señala que el comercio es equivalente al progreso tecnológico en el sector de bienes comercializables. Por lo tanto, una economía abierta tiene un mayor ingreso pero menor crecimiento que una economía cerrada. Además, la reasignación de actividad de un país a otro puede tener un efecto negativo sobre la asistencia pública cuando se produce un aprendizaje mediante la experiencia en países específicos.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio Spilimbergo, 1995. "La desindustrialización y el comercio," Research Department Publications 4015, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4015

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Baumol, William J, 1972. "Macroeconomics of Unbalanced Growth: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 150-150, March.
    2. Bernard, Andrew B & Jones, Charles I, 1996. "Productivity across Industries and Countries: Time Series Theory and Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 135-146, February.
    3. Wieczorek J., 1995. "Sectoral trends in world employment," ILO Working Papers 993083973402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Dornbusch, Rudiger & Fischer, Stanley & Samuelson, Paul A, 1977. "Comparative Advantage, Trade, and Payments in a Ricardian Model with a Continuum of Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 823-839, December.
    6. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405.
    7. Brezis, Elise S & Krugman, Paul R & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1993. "Leapfrogging in International Competition: A Theory of Cycles in National Technological Leadership," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1211-1219, December.
    8. Krugman, Paul, 1987. "The narrow moving band, the Dutch disease, and the competitive consequences of Mrs. Thatcher : Notes on trade in the presence of dynamic scale economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1-2), pages 41-55, October.
    9. Bernard, Andrew B & Jones, Charles I, 1996. "Comparing Apples to Oranges: Productivity Convergence and Measurement across Industries and Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1216-1238, December.
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