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Can Public Spending Boost Private Consumption?

Author

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  • Stylianos Asimakopoulos

    (Stirling Management School, Economics Division, University of Stirling)

  • Marco Lorusso

    (Centre for Energy Economics Research and Policy, Heriot-Watt University)

  • Luca Pieroni

    (Department of Political Science, University of Perugia)

Abstract

This paper analyses the effects on private consumption from an increase in productive and unproductive public spending. A new Keynesian model incorporating price and wage rigidities, monetary policy and various fiscal rules is developed and estimated, using Bayesian techniques, to capture the key cyclical characteristics of the US economy. We find that price and wage rigidities along with a positive shock to the part of public spending that is productive are sufficient to boost private consumption. Moreover, we show that this initial positive reaction of private consumption is adequate to create a positive present value consumption multiplier for more than five years. Finally, we show that our main results remain robust to changes in the monetary rule and the various methods of deficit financing.

Suggested Citation

  • Stylianos Asimakopoulos & Marco Lorusso & Luca Pieroni, 2016. "Can Public Spending Boost Private Consumption?," CEERP Working Paper Series 005, Centre for Energy Economics Research and Policy, Heriot-Watt University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hwc:wpaper:005
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    Cited by:

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    2. Huang, Kevin X.D. & Liu, Fengqi & Meng, Qinglai & Xue, Jianpo, 2022. "Keeping up with the Joneses and the consumption response to government spending," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 220(C).
    3. Stefano Grassi & Marco Lorusso & Francesco Ravazzolo, 2021. "Adaptive Importance Sampling for DSGE Models," BEMPS - Bozen Economics & Management Paper Series BEMPS84, Faculty of Economics and Management at the Free University of Bozen.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal rules; price rigidities; taylor rule; bayesian estimation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy; Modern Monetary Theory
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General

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