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Fiscal Stimulus with Spending Reversals

Author

Listed:
  • Giancarlo Corsetti

    (Cambridge University and CEPR)

  • André Meier

    (International Monetary Fund)

  • Gernot J. Müller

    (University of Bonn and CEPR)

Abstract

The short-run effects of fiscal policy depend not only on current tax and spending choices, but also on expectations about future policy adjustment. While general equilibrium models typically restrict medium-term adjustment to taxation, we highlight the importance of government spending dynamics. First, we provide time series evidence for the United States suggesting that an exogenous increase in government spending prompts a rise in public debt, followed over time by a reduction in spending below trend. Second, we show how expected spending reversals alter the short-run impact of fiscal policy in a new Keynesian model, bringing it closer in line with the evidence. © 2012 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Giancarlo Corsetti & André Meier & Gernot J. Müller, 2012. "Fiscal Stimulus with Spending Reversals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(4), pages 878-895, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:94:y:2012:i:4:p:878-895
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. F. Lobo & M. Caba-as Sáenz & R. González Pérez, 2005. "Review of economic studies of the pharmaceutical industry published over the last 20 years by Spanish economists," Chapters, in: Jaume Puig-Junoy (ed.), The Public Financing of Pharmaceuticals, chapter 11, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Fabio Canova & Evi Pappa, 2007. "Price Differentials in Monetary Unions: The Role of Fiscal Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(520), pages 713-737, April.
    3. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 2002. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1329-1368.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal policy transmission; consumption; real exchange rate; real interest rate; sticky prices; monetary policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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