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Fiscal Shocks and The Real Exchange Rate

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  • Agustín S. Bénétrix

    (IIIS Trinity College Dublin)

Abstract

more persistent impact on the real exchange rate than shocks to government consumption. Within the latter category, we also show that the impact of shocks to the wage component of government consumption is larger than for shocks to the non-wage component.

Suggested Citation

  • Agustín S. Bénétrix, 2009. "Fiscal Shocks and The Real Exchange Rate," 2009 Meeting Papers 1137, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed009:1137
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange

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