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The Impact of Fiscal Shocks on the Irish Economy

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  • Agustín S. Bénétrix and Philip R. Lane

Abstract

We study the short-run effects of shocks to government spending on Ireland’s output and its real exchange rate. We show that the impact of government spending shocks critically depend on the nature of the fiscal innovation. Our main finding is that there are important differences between shocks to public investment and shocks to government consumption. Moreover, within the latter category, shocks to the wage and non-wage components also have dissimilar effects.

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  • Agustín S. Bénétrix and Philip R. Lane, 2009. "The Impact of Fiscal Shocks on the Irish Economy," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp281, IIIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp281
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    Cited by:

    1. Weonho Yang & Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh, 2012. "Macroeconomic Effects of Government Spending Shocks: New Evidence Using Natural Disaster Relief in Korea," CESifo Working Paper Series 3943, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Ibhagui, Oyakhilome, 2017. "Linking Fiscal Policy and External Competitiveness in Sub-Saharan Africa – Does Government Spending Drive The Real Exchange Rate in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 77291, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 03 Mar 2017.
    3. Weonho Yang & Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh, 2014. "Using Military Build-Ups to Capture Fiscal Shocks: A Reassessment," CESifo Working Paper Series 4689, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Cimadomo, Jacopo & Bénassy-Quéré, Agnès, 2012. "Changing patterns of fiscal policy multipliers in Germany, the UK and the US," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 845-873.
    5. Niamh Hardiman, 2010. "Bringing Domestic Institutions Back into Understanding Ireland’s Economic Crisis," Working Papers 201042, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Jacopo Cimadomo & Sebastian Hauptmeier & Sergio Sola, 2011. "Identifying the Effects of Government Spending Shocks with and without Expected Reversal: an Approach Based on U.S. Real-Time Data," IHEID Working Papers 12-2011, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    7. Francisco Castro & Daniel Garrote, 2015. "The effects of fiscal shocks on the exchange rate in the EMU and differences with the USA," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1341-1365, December.
    8. Clancy, Daragh & Jacquinot, Pascal & Lozej, Matija, 2014. "The Effects of Government Spending in a Small Open Economy within a Monetary Union," Research Technical Papers 12/RT/14, Central Bank of Ireland.
    9. Francisco de Castro & Laura Fernández, 2013. "The Effects Of Fiscal Shocks On The Exchange Rate In Spain," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(2), pages 151-180.
    10. Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh & Weonho Yang, 2015. "Natural Disasters, Government Spending, and the Fiscal Multiplier," CESifo Working Paper Series 5665, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Galstyan, Vahagn & Lane, Philip R., 2009. "Fiscal Policy and International Competitiveness: Evidence from Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(3), pages 299-315.
    12. Weonho Yang & Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh, 2012. "Government Spending Shocks and the Multiplier: New Evidence from the U.S. Based on Natural Disasters," CESifo Working Paper Series 4005, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Niamh Hardiman, 2013. "Rethinking the political economy of fiscal consolidation in two recessions in Ireland," Working Papers 201316, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    14. Daragh Clancy & Pascal Jacquinot & Matija Lozej, 2015. "Government expenditure composition and fiscal policy spillovers in a small open economy within a monetary union," Working Papers 4, European Stability Mechanism.
    15. Sebastian Gechert & Ansgar Rannenberg, 2014. "Are Fiscal Multipliers Regime-Dependent? A Meta Regression Analysis," IMK Working Paper 139-2014, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    16. Kelly, Robert & McQuinn, Kieran, 2013. "On the hook for impaired bank lending: Do sovereign-bank inter-linkages affect the fiscal multiplier?," Research Technical Papers 01/RT/13, Central Bank of Ireland.
    17. Jérôme Creel & Éric Heyer & Mathieu Plane, 2011. "Petit précis de politique budgétaire par tous les temps. Les multiplicateurs budgétaires au cours du cycle," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(1), pages 61-88.
    18. Lane, Philip R., 2009. "A New Fiscal Strategy for Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(2), pages 233-253.
    19. Philip Lane, 2010. "External Imbalances and Fiscal Policy," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp314, IIIS.

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