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Macroeconomic Effects of Government Spending Shocks: New Evidence Using Natural Distaster Relief in Korea

  • Weonho Yang

    ()

  • Jan Fidrmuc

    ()

  • Sugata Ghosh

    ()

We investigate the macroeconomic effects of government spending shocks in Korea. We compare results obtained with two alternative approaches: the narrative approach and Structural Vector-Autoregressive model (SVAR). We propose a new methodology for identifying exogenous and unexpected fiscal shocks under the narrative approach: natural disasters and the associated government emergency spending in the wake of such disasters. Our results suggest that when government spending increases, the responses of GDP, private consumption, real wage and investment are all positive, which is in accord with the New Keynesian model. Similar results are obtained with both approaches. However, comparing the two approaches suggests that the timing is very important in identifying government spending shocks due to the anticipation effects of fiscal policy.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University in its series CEDI Discussion Paper Series with number 12-05.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:edb:cedidp:12-05
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  1. Kiseok Hong, 2010. "Fiscal Policy Issues in Korea after the Current Crisis," Working Papers id:2982, eSocialSciences.
  2. Benetrix, Agustin & Lane, Philip R., 2009. "The Impact of Fiscal Shocks on the Irish Economy," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(4), pages 407-434.
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  4. Karel Mertens & Morten Ravn, 2010. "Empirical Evidence on the Aggregate Effects of Anticipated and Unanticipated U.S. Tax Policy Shocks," NBER Working Papers 16289, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  10. Robert J. Barro & Charles J. Redlick, 2011. "Macroeconomic Effects From Government Purchases and Taxes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 51-102.
  11. Andrew Mountford & Harald Uhlig, 2008. "What are the Effects of Fiscal Policy Shocks?," NBER Working Papers 14551, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Casey B. Mulligan, 1998. "Pecuniary Incentives to Work in the United States during World War II," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 1033-1077, October.
  13. Young Lee & Changyong Rhee & Taeyoon Sung, 2006. "Fiscal policy in Korea: Before and after the financial crisis," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 509-531, August.
  14. Raffaela Giordano & Sandro Momigliano & Stefano Neri & Roberto Perotti, 2008. "The effetcs of fiscal policy in Italy: Evidence from a VAR model," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 656, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  15. Ilan Noy, 2007. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Disasters," Working Papers 200707, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  16. Burnside, Craig & Eichenbaum, Martin & Fisher, Jonas D. M., 2004. "Fiscal shocks and their consequences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 89-117, March.
  17. Devereux, Michael B & Head, Allen C & Lapham, Beverly J, 1996. "Monopolistic Competition, Increasing Returns, and the Effects of Government Spending," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(2), pages 233-54, May.
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