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On Fiscal Multipliers: Estimates From A Medium Scale Dsge Model

Listed author(s):
  • SARAH ZUBAIRY

This article contributes to the debate on fiscal multipliers, in the context of an estimated dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model, featuring a rich fiscal policy block and a transmission mechanism for government spending shocks. I find the multiplier for government spending to be 1.07, which is largest on impact. The multipliers for labor and capital tax on impact are 0.13 and 0.34, respectively. The effects of tax cuts take time to build and exceed stimulative effects of spending by 12–20 quarters. I carry out counterfactual exercises to show how alternative financing methods and expected monetary policy have consequences for the size of fiscal multipliers.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/iere.2014.55.issue-1
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Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association in its journal International Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 55 (2014)
Issue (Month): (02)
Pages: 169-195

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Handle: RePEc:wly:iecrev:v:55:y:2014:i::p:169-195
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