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Christian vom Lehn

Personal Details

First Name:Christian
Middle Name:
Last Name:vom Lehn
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvo233
http://sites.google.com/site/cvomlehn/

Affiliation

(50%) Department of Economics
Brigham Young University

Provo, Utah (United States)
http://econ.byu.edu/
RePEc:edi:debyuus (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Software

Working papers

  1. vom Lehn, Christian & Ellsworth, Cache & Kroff, Zachary, 2020. "Reconciling Occupational Mobility in the Current Population Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 13509, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Joseph Price & Christian vom Lehn & Riley Wilson, 2020. "The Winners and Losers of Immigration: Evidence from Linked Historical Data," NBER Working Papers 27156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jeffrey T. Denning & Brian Jacob & Lars Lefgren & Christian vom Lehn, 2019. "The Return to Hours Worked Within and Across Occupations: Implications for the Gender Wage Gap," NBER Working Papers 25739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Christian vom Lehn & Thomas Winberry, 2019. "The Investment Network, Sectoral Comovement, and the Changing U.S. Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 26507, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Christian vom Lehn & Thomas Winberry, 2018. "The Changing Nature of Sectoral Comovement," 2018 Meeting Papers 277, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Christian vom Lehn & Aspen Gorry & Eric Fisher, 2016. "Male Labor Supply and Generational Fiscal Policy," 2016 Meeting Papers 536, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Christian vom Lehn, 2015. "Labor Market Polarization, the Decline of Routine Work, and Technological Change: A Quantitative Evaluation," 2015 Meeting Papers 151, Society for Economic Dynamics.

Articles

  1. vom Lehn, Christian, 2020. "Labor market polarization, the decline of routine work, and technological change: A quantitative analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 62-80.
  2. Gorry, Aspen & Munro, David & vom Lehn, Christian, 2020. "Experience, skill composition, and the persistence of unemployment fluctuations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
  3. Christian vom Lehn & Eric Fisher & Aspen Gorry, 2018. "Male Labor Supply and Generational Fiscal Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 28, pages 121-149, April.
  4. vom Lehn, Christian, 2018. "Understanding the decline in the U.S. labor share: Evidence from occupational tasks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 191-220.

Software components

  1. Christian vom Lehn & Eric Fisher & Aspen Gorry, 2017. "Code and data files for "Male Labor Supply and Generational Fiscal Policy"," Computer Codes 17-49, Review of Economic Dynamics.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. vom Lehn, Christian & Ellsworth, Cache & Kroff, Zachary, 2020. "Reconciling Occupational Mobility in the Current Population Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 13509, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Price & Christian vom Lehn & Riley Wilson, 2020. "The Winners and Losers of Immigration: Evidence from Linked Historical Data," NBER Working Papers 27156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Maximiliano Dvorkin, 2021. "International trade and labor reallocation: misclassification errors, mobility, and switching costs," Working Papers 2021-014, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 08 Dec 2021.

  2. Joseph Price & Christian vom Lehn & Riley Wilson, 2020. "The Winners and Losers of Immigration: Evidence from Linked Historical Data," NBER Working Papers 27156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Jongkwan Lee & Giovanni Peri & Vasil Yasenov, 2019. "The Labor Market Effects of Mexican Repatriations: Longitudinal Evidence from the 1930s," NBER Working Papers 26399, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ran Abramitzky & Philipp Ager & Leah Boustan & Elior Cohen & Casper Hansen, 2021. "The Effect of Immigration on Local Labor Markets: Lessons from the 1920s Border Closure," Research Working Paper RWP 21-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

  3. Jeffrey T. Denning & Brian Jacob & Lars Lefgren & Christian vom Lehn, 2019. "The Return to Hours Worked Within and Across Occupations: Implications for the Gender Wage Gap," NBER Working Papers 25739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. German Cubas & Chinhui Juhn & Pedro Silos, 2020. "Coordinated Work Schedules and the Gender Wage Gap," DETU Working Papers 2002, Department of Economics, Temple University.
    2. Kevin L. McKinney & John M. Abowd & Hubert P. Janicki, 2021. "U.S. Long-Term Earnings Outcomes by Sex, Race, Ethnicity, and Place of Birth," Working Papers 21-07, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    3. Contensou, François & Vranceanu, Radu, 2019. "Working time and wage rate differences : a contract theory approach," ESSEC Working Papers WP1913, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School, revised 06 Mar 2021.
    4. Alexander Bick & Adam Blandin & Richard Rogerson, 2019. "Hours and Wages," 2019 Meeting Papers 261, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Contensou, François & Vranceanu, Radu, 2021. "Working time and wage rate differences: Revisiting the role of preferences and labor scarcity," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 164-175.

  4. Christian vom Lehn & Thomas Winberry, 2019. "The Investment Network, Sectoral Comovement, and the Changing U.S. Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 26507, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Molnárová, Zuzana & Reiter, Michael, 2022. "Technology, demand, and productivity: What an industry model tells us about business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 134(C).
    2. Andrew Foerster & Andreas Hornstein & Pierre-Daniel Sarte & Mark W. Watson, 2019. "Aggregate Implications of Changing Sectoral Trends," NBER Working Papers 25867, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Dossche, Maarten & Gazzani, Andrea & Lewis, Vivien, 2021. "Labor adjustment and productivity in the OECD," Working Paper Series 2571, European Central Bank.
    4. Joshua Brault & Hashmat Khan, 2021. "Large Firms and the Cyclicality of US Labour Productivity," Carleton Economic Papers 21-02, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised 27 May 2021.
    5. Marco Pangallo, 2020. "Synchronization of endogenous business cycles," Papers 2002.06555, arXiv.org.

  5. Christian vom Lehn & Aspen Gorry & Eric Fisher, 2016. "Male Labor Supply and Generational Fiscal Policy," 2016 Meeting Papers 536, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Erin Wolcott, 2018. "Employment Inequality: Why Do the Low-Skilled Work Less Now?," 2018 Meeting Papers 487, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Benjamin Bridgman, 2016. "Engines of Leisure," BEA Working Papers 0137, Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    3. Cooley, Thomas & Henriksen, Espen, 2018. "The demographic deficit," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 45-62.

  6. Christian vom Lehn, 2015. "Labor Market Polarization, the Decline of Routine Work, and Technological Change: A Quantitative Evaluation," 2015 Meeting Papers 151, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jaimovich, Nir & Saporta-Eksten, Itay & Siu, Henry E. & Yedid-Levi, Yaniv, 2020. "The Macroeconomics of Automation: Data, Theory, and Policy Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 12913, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2018. "On the Welfare Implications of Automation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 15-43, July.
    3. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2019. "Capital Composition and the Declining Labor Share," CESifo Working Paper Series 7996, CESifo.
    4. vom Lehn, Christian, 2018. "Understanding the decline in the U.S. labor share: Evidence from occupational tasks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 191-220.
    5. Cortes, Guido Matias & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E., 2017. "Disappearing routine jobs: Who, how, and why?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-87.

Articles

  1. vom Lehn, Christian, 2020. "Labor market polarization, the decline of routine work, and technological change: A quantitative analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 62-80.

    Cited by:

    1. Zsofia Barany & Christian Siegel, 2019. "Engines of Sectoral Labor Productivity Growth," 2019 Meeting Papers 872, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Wenbo Zhu, . "Hollowing Out and Slowing Growth: the Role of Process Innovations," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Eeckhout, Jan & Hedtrich, Christoph & Pinheiro, Roberto, 2021. "IT and Urban Polarization," CEPR Discussion Papers 16540, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Jaimovich, Nir & Saporta-Eksten, Itay & Siu, Henry E. & Yedid-Levi, Yaniv, 2020. "The Macroeconomics of Automation: Data, Theory, and Policy Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 12913, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2019. "Capital Composition and the Declining Labor Share," CESifo Working Paper Series 7996, CESifo.
    6. Hennig, Jan-Luca, 2021. "Labor Market Polarization and Intergenerational Mobility: Theory and Evidence," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242353, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Uluc Aysun & Melanie Guldi & Adam Honig & Zeynep Yom, 2020. "R&D, Market Power and the Cyclicality of Employment," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 47, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    8. Noritaka Kudoh & Hiroaki Miyamoto, 2021. "Robots and Unemployment," Working Papers SDES-2021-5, Kochi University of Technology, School of Economics and Management, revised May 2021.
    9. M. Battisti & M. Del Gatto & A. F. Gravina & C. F. Parmeter, 2021. "Robots versus labor skills: a complementarity/substitutability analysis," Working Paper CRENoS 202104, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    10. Chen, Chaoran, 2020. "Capital-skill complementarity, sectoral labor productivity, and structural transformation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 116(C).

  2. Gorry, Aspen & Munro, David & vom Lehn, Christian, 2020. "Experience, skill composition, and the persistence of unemployment fluctuations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Lalé, Etienne, 2018. "Loss of skill and labor market fluctuations," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 20-31.
    2. Kandoussi, Malak & Langot, François, 2020. "The Lockdown Impact on Unemployment for Heterogeneous Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 13439, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Fieldhouse, Andrew & Howard, Sean & Koch, Christoffer & Munro, David, 2022. "A New Claims-Based Unemployment Dataset: Application to Postwar Recoveries Across U.S. States," GLO Discussion Paper Series 1066, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Holmberg, Johan, 2021. "Earnings and Employment Dynamics: Capturing Cyclicality using Mixed Frequency Data," Umeå Economic Studies 991, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

  3. Christian vom Lehn & Eric Fisher & Aspen Gorry, 2018. "Male Labor Supply and Generational Fiscal Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 28, pages 121-149, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. vom Lehn, Christian, 2018. "Understanding the decline in the U.S. labor share: Evidence from occupational tasks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 191-220.

    Cited by:

    1. Daron Acemoglu & Pascual Restrepo, 2019. "Automation and New Tasks: How Technology Displaces and Reinstates Labor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 3-30, Spring.
    2. Gonzalo Castex & Stanley Cho & Evgenia Dechter, 2021. "The Decline in Capital-Skill Complementarity," Discussion Papers 2021-06, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    3. Gries, Thomas & Naudé, Wim, 2020. "Artificial Intelligence, Income Distribution and Economic Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 13606, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. vom Lehn, Christian, 2020. "Labor market polarization, the decline of routine work, and technological change: A quantitative analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 62-80.
    5. Lee E. Ohanian & Musa Orak & Shihan Shen, 2021. "Revisiting Capital-Skill Complementarity, Inequality, and Labor Share," International Finance Discussion Papers 1319, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Mary O'Mahony & Michela Vecchi & Francesco Venturini, 2019. "Technology, Intangible Assets and the Decline of the Labor Share," Economic Statistics Centre of Excellence (ESCoE) Discussion Papers ESCoE DP-2019-17, Economic Statistics Centre of Excellence (ESCoE).
    7. Ariell Reshef & Gianluca Santoni, 2019. "Are Your Labor Shares Set in Beijing? The View through the Lens of Global Value Chains," Working Papers 2019-16, CEPII research center.
    8. Irina Yakovenko, 2020. "Fuzzy Stochastic Automation Model for Decision Support in the Process Inter-Budgetary Regulation," Mathematics, MDPI, vol. 9(1), pages 1-17, December.

Software components

    Sorry, no citations of software components recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (3) 2019-04-22 2020-01-06 2021-05-10. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (2) 2015-07-25 2016-09-04. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2020-06-15 2020-09-14. Author is listed
  4. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2019-04-22
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2020-06-15
  6. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2015-07-25
  7. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2020-06-15
  8. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2020-01-06
  9. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2020-06-15
  10. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (1) 2020-06-15
  11. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2020-06-15

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