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Jonathan N. Chapman

Personal Details

First Name:Jonathan
Middle Name:N.
Last Name:Chapman
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1715
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://jnchapman.com
Twitter: @chapman_econ

Affiliation

Economics
New York University Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
https://nyuad.nyu.edu/en/academics/divisions/social-science.html




RePEc:edi:ecnyuae (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jonathan Chapman, 2020. "Extension of the Franchise and Government Expenditure on Public Goods: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century England," Working Papers 20200045, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Mar 2020.
  2. Jonathan Chapman, 2020. "Democracy, Redistribution, and Inequality: Evidence from the English Poor Law," Working Papers 20200050, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Jun 2020.
  3. Jonathan Chapman, 2020. "Financing sanitation infrastructure in nineteenth-century England and Wales," Working Papers 20200049, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Jun 2020.
  4. Jonathan Chapman & Erik Snowberg & Stephanie Wang & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Loss Attitudes in the U.S. Population: Evidence from Dynamically Optimized Sequential Experimentation (DOSE)," NBER Working Papers 25072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Jonathan Chapman & Mark Dean & Pietro Ortoleva & Erik Snowberg & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Econographics," NBER Working Papers 24931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Jonathan Chapman & Mark Dean & Pietro Ortoleva & Erik Snowberg & Colin Camerer, 2017. "Willingness to Pay and Willingness to Accept are Probably Less Correlated Than You Think," NBER Working Papers 23954, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Chapman, Jonathan, 2016. "Democratic reform and opposition to government expenditure : evidence from nineteenth-century Britain," Economics Working Papers MWP2016/21, European University Institute.

Articles

  1. Chao, Matthew & Chapman, Jonathan, 2020. "Saving face through preference signaling and obligation avoidance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 569-581.
  2. Jonathan Chapman, 2019. "The contribution of infrastructure investment to Britain's urban mortality decline, 1861–1900," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 233-259, February.
  3. Chapman, Jonathan, 2018. "Democratic Reform and Opposition to Government Expenditure: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Britain," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 13(4), pages 363-404, October.
  4. Chapman, Jonathan, 2013. "The Rise of a Victorian Ironopolis: Middlesborough and Regional Industrialization. By Minoru Yasumoto. Woodbridge: Boydell. 2011. Pp. xvii, 230. $99.00, hardcover," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 73(3), pages 876-877, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jonathan Chapman, 2020. "Extension of the Franchise and Government Expenditure on Public Goods: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century England," Working Papers 20200045, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Mar 2020.

    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Chapman, 2020. "Democracy, Redistribution, and Inequality: Evidence from the English Poor Law," Working Papers 20200050, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Jun 2020.

  2. Jonathan Chapman & Erik Snowberg & Stephanie Wang & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Loss Attitudes in the U.S. Population: Evidence from Dynamically Optimized Sequential Experimentation (DOSE)," NBER Working Papers 25072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Christina Korting & Carl Lieberman & Jordan Matsudaira & Zhuan Pei & Yi Shen, 2020. "Visual Inference and Graphical Representation in Regression Discontinuity Designs," Working Papers 638, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Ola Andersson & H�kan J. Holm & Jean-Robert Tyran & Erik Wengström, 2018. "Robust Inference in Risk Elicitation Tasks," Discussion Papers 18-09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    3. Potrafke, Niklas, 2019. "Risk aversion, patience and intelligence: Evidence based on macro data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 116-120.
    4. Amador, Luis & Brañas-Garza, Pablo & Espín, Antonio M. & Garcia, Teresa & Hernández, Ana, 2019. "Consistent and inconsistent choices under uncertainty: The role of cognitive abilities," MPRA Paper 95178, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Lau Lilleholt, 2019. "Cognitive ability and risk aversion: A systematic review and meta analysis," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 14(3), pages 234-279, May.
    6. Diogo Geraldes & Franziska Heinicke & Duk Gyoo Kim, 2020. "Big and Small Lies," CESifo Working Paper Series 8142, CESifo.
    7. Sanjit Dhami & Narges Hajimoladarvish, 2020. "Mental Accounting, Loss Aversion, and Tax Evasion: Theory and Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 8606, CESifo.
    8. Arkady Konovalov & Ian Krajbich, 2019. "Revealed strength of preference: Inference from response times," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 14(4), pages 381-394, July.
    9. Nicholas C. Barberis & Lawrence J. Jin & Baolian Wang, 2020. "Prospect Theory and Stock Market Anomalies," NBER Working Papers 27155, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Bnaya Dreyfuss & Ori Heffetz & Matthew Rabin, 2019. "Expectations-Based Loss Aversion May Help Explain Seemingly Dominated Choices in Strategy-Proof Mechanisms," NBER Working Papers 26394, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Jonathan Chapman & Mark Dean & Pietro Ortoleva & Erik Snowberg & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Econographics," NBER Working Papers 24931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Jagelka, Tomáš, 2020. "Are Economists' Preferences Psychologists' Personality Traits? A Structural Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 13303, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Tomáš Jagelka, 2020. "Are Economists’ Preferences Psychologists’ Personality Traits? A Structural Approach," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 014, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
    3. Basu, Pathikrit & Echenique, Federico, 0. "On the falsifiability and learnability of decision theories," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society.

  4. Jonathan Chapman & Mark Dean & Pietro Ortoleva & Erik Snowberg & Colin Camerer, 2017. "Willingness to Pay and Willingness to Accept are Probably Less Correlated Than You Think," NBER Working Papers 23954, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes G. Jaspersen & Marc A. Ragin & Justin R. Sydnor, 2019. "Predicting Insurance Demand from Risk Attitudes," NBER Working Papers 26508, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Jonathan Chapman & Mark Dean & Pietro Ortoleva & Erik Snowberg & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Econographics," CESifo Working Paper Series 7202, CESifo.
      • Jonathan Chapman & Mark Dean & Pietro Ortoleva & Erik Snowberg & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Econographics," NBER Working Papers 24931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jonathan Chapman & Erik Snowberg & Stephanie Wang & Colin Camerer, 2018. "Loss Attitudes in the U.S. Population: Evidence from Dynamically Optimized Sequential Experimentation (DOSE)," NBER Working Papers 25072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Brown, Jeffrey R. & Kapteyn, Arie & Luttmer, Erzo F.P. & Mitchell, Olivia S. & Samek, Anya, 2019. "Behavioral Impediments to Valuing Annuities: Complexity and Choice Bracketing," IZA Discussion Papers 12263, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Smith, Alec, 2019. "Lagged beliefs and reference-dependent utility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 331-340.
    6. Basu, Pathikrit & Echenique, Federico, 0. "On the falsifiability and learnability of decision theories," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society.
    7. Guney, Begum & Richter, Michael & Tsur, Matan, 2018. "Aspiration-based choice," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 935-956.

  5. Chapman, Jonathan, 2016. "Democratic reform and opposition to government expenditure : evidence from nineteenth-century Britain," Economics Working Papers MWP2016/21, European University Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Batinti & Joan Costa-i-Font & Timothy J. Hatton, 2019. "Voting Up? The Effects of Democracy and Franchise Extension on Human Stature," CESifo Working Paper Series 7701, CESifo.
    2. Aidt, T. & Winer, S. & Zhang, P., 2020. "Franchise extension and fiscal structure in the United Kingdom 1820-1913: A new test of the Redistribution Hypothesis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2008, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

Articles

  1. Jonathan Chapman, 2019. "The contribution of infrastructure investment to Britain's urban mortality decline, 1861–1900," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 72(1), pages 233-259, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Batinti & Joan Costa-i-Font & Timothy J. Hatton, 2019. "Voting Up? The Effects of Democracy and Franchise Extension on Human Stature," CESifo Working Paper Series 7701, CESifo.
    2. Gallardo Albarran, Daniel, 2018. "Sanitary infrastructures and the decline of mortality in Germany, 1877-1913," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-176, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
    3. W. Walker Hanlon & Casper Worm Hansen & Jake W. Kantor, 2020. "Temperature, Disease, and Death in London: Analyzing Weekly Data for the Century from 1866-1965," NBER Working Papers 27333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Chapman, Jonathan, 2018. "Democratic Reform and Opposition to Government Expenditure: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Britain," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 13(4), pages 363-404, October. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (4) 2016-10-09 2020-08-10 2020-08-10 2020-08-17. Author is listed
  2. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (3) 2017-11-05 2017-11-12 2018-11-05. Author is listed
  3. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2016-10-09 2020-08-10
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2018-11-05
  5. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2016-10-09
  6. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2018-09-17
  7. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2020-08-10
  8. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2018-10-15

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