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Daniel R. Carroll

Personal Details

First Name:Daniel
Middle Name:R.
Last Name:Carroll
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pca568
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.clevelandfed.org/Research/Economists/carroll/index.cfm
Terminal Degree:2009 Department of Economics; University of Virginia (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economic Research
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Cleveland, Ohio (United States)
http://www.clevelandfed.org/Research/

216.579.2000

1455 East 6th St., Cleveland OH 44114
RePEc:edi:efrbcus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Software

Working papers

  1. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2020. "On the Distributional Effects of International Tariffs," Working Papers 202018, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  2. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2019. "The Dynamics of the Racial Wealth Gap," Working Papers 201918, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  3. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2019. "On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade," Working Papers 201906, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  4. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2019. "What Explains Neighborhood Sorting by Income and Race?," Working Papers 201808R, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  5. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2018. "Can Wealth Explain Neighborhood Sorting by Race and Income?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1808, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  6. Daniel R. Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric R. Young, 2017. "The Politics of Flat Taxes," Working Papers 201442R, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  7. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2017. "Neoclassical Inequality," Working Papers 201432R2, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  8. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2016. "Mobility," Working Papers (Old Series) 1634, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  9. Daniel R. Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric R. Young, 2015. "Majority Voting: A Quantitative Investigation," Working Papers (Old Series) 1442, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  10. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2014. "The Piketty Transition," Working Papers (Old Series) 1432, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  11. Daniel R. Carroll, 2013. "The demand for income tax progressivity in the growth model," Working Papers (Old Series) 1106, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  12. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2012. "Neighborhood dynamics and the distribution of opportunity," Working Papers (Old Series) 1212, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  13. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The long run effects of changes in tax progressivity," Working Papers (Old Series) 0913, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  14. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "A note on sunspots with heterogeneous agents," Working Papers (Old Series) 0906, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

Articles

  1. Daniel Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric Young, 2021. "The Politics of Flat Taxes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 39, pages 174-201, January.
  2. Carroll, Daniel R. & Hur, Sewon, 2020. "On the heterogeneous welfare gains and losses from trade," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 1-16.
  3. Daniel R. Carroll & Ross Cohen-Kristiansen, 2020. "Why Are Headline PCE and Median PCE Inflations So Far Apart?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, vol. 2020(24), pages 1-6, October.
  4. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2019. "The Winners and Losers from Trade," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue September.
  5. Daniel R. Carroll & Randal Verbrugge, 2019. "Behavior of a New Median PCE Measure: A Tale of Tails," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue July.
  6. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2019. "What Is Behind the Persistence of the Racial Wealth Gap?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue February.
  7. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2018. "Neighborhood dynamics and the distribution of opportunity," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 9(1), pages 247-303, March.
  8. Carroll, Daniel R. & Young, Eric R., 2018. "Neoclassical inequality," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 83-109.
  9. Daniel R. Carroll & Nicholas Hoffman, 2017. "New Data on Wealth Mobility and Their Impact on Models of Inequality," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue June.
  10. Daniel R. Carroll & Anne Chen, 2016. "Income Inequality Matters, but Mobility Is Just as Important," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue June.
  11. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2015. "Zero Growth and Long-Run Inequality," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue September.
  12. Daniel R. Carroll, 2014. "Why Do Economists Still Disagree over Government Spending Multipliers?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue May.
  13. Daniel R. Carroll, 2012. "Time-consistent rules in monetary and fiscal policy," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Nov.
  14. Daniel R. Carroll & John Lindner, 2011. "Reducing the federal deficit: approaches in some other countries," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Oct.
  15. Carroll, Daniel R. & Young, Eric R., 2011. "The long run effects of changes in tax progressivity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 1451-1473, September.
  16. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The Stationary Distribution of Wealth under Progressive Taxation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(3), pages 469-478, July.

Software components

  1. Daniel Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric Young, 2020. "Code and data files for "The Politics of Flat Taxes"," Computer Codes 18-193, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  2. Daniel Carroll & Eric Young, 2008. "Code and data files for "The Stationary Distribution of Wealth under Progressive Taxation"," Computer Codes 07-101, Review of Economic Dynamics.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2019. "On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade," Working Papers 201906R2, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Mentioned in:

    1. On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2019-11-15 02:09:41
  2. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2014. "The Piketty Transition," Working Papers (Old Series) 1432, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Inequality and zero growth
      by nawmsayn in ZeeConomics on 2015-02-01 17:56:26

Working papers

  1. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2020. "On the Distributional Effects of International Tariffs," Working Papers 202018, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2019. "On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade," Working Papers 201906R2, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    2. David Kohn & Fernando Leibovici & Michal Szkup, 2019. "Financial Development and Trade Liberalization," 2019 Meeting Papers 1212, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Michael E. Waugh, 2019. "The Consumption Response to Trade Shocks: Evidence from the US-China Trade War," NBER Working Papers 26353, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Sewon Hur, 2020. "The Distributional Effects of COVID-19 and Optimal Mitigation Policies," Globalization Institute Working Papers 400, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 23 Oct 2020.

  2. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2019. "The Dynamics of the Racial Wealth Gap," Working Papers 201918, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Hero Ashman & Seth Neumuller, 2019. "Online Appendix to "Can Income Differences Explain the Racial Wealth Gap: A Quantitative Analysis"," Online Appendices 18-559, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    2. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2019. "What Is Behind the Persistence of the Racial Wealth Gap?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue February.
    3. Peter Ganong & Damon Jones & Pascal Noel & Diana Farrell & Fiona Greig & Chris Wheat, 2020. "Wealth, Race, and Consumption Smoothing of Typical Income Shocks," Working Papers 2020-49, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.

  3. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2019. "On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade," Working Papers 201906, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. David Kohn & Fernando Leibovici & Michal Szkup, 2019. "Financial Development and Trade Liberalization," 2019 Meeting Papers 1212, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Xavier Jaravel & Erick Sager, 2019. "What are the Price Effects of Trade? Evidence from the U.S. and Implications for Quantitative Trade Models," 2019 Meeting Papers 1320, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2020. "On the Distributional Effects of International Tariffs," Working Papers 202018, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    4. Ma, Yong & Chen, Diandian, 2020. "Openness, rural-urban inequality, and happiness in China," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 44(4).
    5. Hottman, Colin J. & Monarch, Ryan, 2020. "A matter of taste: Estimating import price inflation across U.S. income groups," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    6. Jaravel, Xavier & Sager, Erick, 2019. "What are the price effects of trade? Evidence from the US for quantitative trade models," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103402, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Handbury, Jessie, 2020. "Comment on “On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade” by Daniel Carroll and Sewon Hur," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 17-19.

  4. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2019. "What Explains Neighborhood Sorting by Income and Race?," Working Papers 201808R, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Dionissi Aliprantis & Hal Martin & Kristen Tauber, 2020. "What Determines the Success of Housing Mobility Programs?," Working Papers 202036, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    2. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2019. "What Is Behind the Persistence of the Racial Wealth Gap?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue February.
    3. Peter Christensen & Ignacio Sarmiento-Barbieri & Christopher Timmins, 2020. "Housing Discrimination and the Toxics Exposure Gap in the United States: Evidence from the Rental Market," NBER Working Papers 26805, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2019. "The Dynamics of the Racial Wealth Gap," Working Papers 201918, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    5. Dionissi Aliprantis & Hal Martin, 2020. "Neighborhood Sorting Obscures Neighborhood Effects in the Opportunity Atlas," Working Papers 202037, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

  5. Daniel R. Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric R. Young, 2017. "The Politics of Flat Taxes," Working Papers 201442R, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2019. "On the Heterogeneous Welfare Gains and Losses from Trade," Working Papers 201906R2, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    2. Daniel R. Carroll & Sewon Hur, 2020. "On the Distributional Effects of International Tariffs," Working Papers 202018, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

  6. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2017. "Neoclassical Inequality," Working Papers 201432R2, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Alvarez-Cuadrado, Fracisco, 2019. "Savings and growth in neoclassical growth models: A comment on “Is Piketty’s “second law of capitalism” fundamental?”," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 128-131.
    2. O. S. Sukharev & E. N. Voronchikhina, 2020. "Structural growth policy in Russia: Resources, technology-intensity, risk, and industrialisation," Journal of New Economy, Ural State University of Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 29-52, March.
    3. Daniel Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric Young, 2021. "The Politics of Flat Taxes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 39, pages 174-201, January.

  7. Daniel R. Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric R. Young, 2015. "Majority Voting: A Quantitative Investigation," Working Papers (Old Series) 1442, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2014. "The Piketty Transition," Working Papers (Old Series) 1432, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

  8. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2014. "The Piketty Transition," Working Papers (Old Series) 1432, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Thomas, 2019. "Determinants of Wealth Inequality and Mobility in General Equilibrium," Working Papers 2019:22, Lund University, Department of Economics.

  9. Daniel R. Carroll, 2013. "The demand for income tax progressivity in the growth model," Working Papers (Old Series) 1106, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The long run effects of changes in tax progressivity," Working Papers (Old Series) 0913, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    2. Daniel R. Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric R. Young, 2015. "Majority Voting: A Quantitative Investigation," Working Papers (Old Series) 1442, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "A note on sunspots with heterogeneous agents," Working Papers (Old Series) 0906, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

  10. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2012. "Neighborhood dynamics and the distribution of opportunity," Working Papers (Old Series) 1212, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2014. "When Should Children Start School?," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 481-536.
    2. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2012. "Assessing the evidence on neighborhood effects from Moving to Opportunity," Working Papers (Old Series) 1122R, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Dionissi Aliprantis & Hal Martin & Kristen Tauber, 2020. "What Determines the Success of Housing Mobility Programs?," Working Papers 202036, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    4. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2013. "Human capital in the inner city," Working Papers (Old Series) 1302, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    5. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2017. "Human capital in the inner city," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 1125-1169, November.
    6. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2019. "What Explains Neighborhood Sorting by Income and Race?," Working Papers 201808R, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    7. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2019. "Racial Inequality, Neighborhood Effects, and Moving to Opportunity," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue October.
    8. Dionissi Aliprantis & Hal Martin, 2020. "Neighborhood Sorting Obscures Neighborhood Effects in the Opportunity Atlas," Working Papers 202037, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    9. Paulo Mourao & Marco António Pinheiro Silveira & Rodrigo Santos De Melo, 2018. "Many Are Never Too Many: An Analysis of Crowdfunding Projects in Brazil," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-13, November.

  11. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The long run effects of changes in tax progressivity," Working Papers (Old Series) 0913, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    Cited by:

    1. Saif asif Khan & Sajawal Khan, 2011. "Optimal Taxation, Inflation and the Formal and Informal Sectors," SBP Working Paper Series 40, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department.
    2. Blundell, Richard William & Pistaferri, Luigi & Saporta-Eksten, Itay, 2012. "Consumption Inequality and Family Labor Supply," CEPR Discussion Papers 9172, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Chen, Shu-Hua, 2020. "Inequality-growth nexus under progressive income taxation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    4. Daniel Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric Young, 2021. "The Politics of Flat Taxes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 39, pages 174-201, January.
    5. Cruz Echevarría, 2015. "Income tax progressivity, growth, income inequality and welfare," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 43-72, March.
    6. Wang, Wei & Suen, Richard M. H., 2015. "Diversity and Economic Growth in a Model with Progressive Taxation," MPRA Paper 67569, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Chun‐Chieh Huang & Juin‐Jen Chang & Hsiao‐Wen Hung, 2020. "Progressive Tax and Inequality in a Unionized Economy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 122(1), pages 38-80, January.
    8. Daniel R. Carroll, 2013. "The demand for income tax progressivity in the growth model," Working Papers (Old Series) 1106, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    9. Echevarría, Cruz A., 2012. "Income tax progressivity, physical capital, aggregate uncertainty and long-run growth in an OLG economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 955-974.
    10. Alireza Shakibaei & MohammadReza Ahmadinejad, 2016. "Investigating the Structural Changes of Tax in Iran," Iranian Economic Review (IER), Faculty of Economics,University of Tehran.Tehran,Iran, vol. 20(4), pages 445-460, Autumn.

Articles

  1. Daniel Carroll & Jim Dolmas & Eric Young, 2021. "The Politics of Flat Taxes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 39, pages 174-201, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Carroll, Daniel R. & Hur, Sewon, 2020. "On the heterogeneous welfare gains and losses from trade," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 1-16.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Daniel R. Carroll & Randal Verbrugge, 2019. "Behavior of a New Median PCE Measure: A Tale of Tails," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue July.

    Cited by:

    1. Saeed Zaman, 2019. "Cyclical versus Acyclical Inflation: A Deeper Dive," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue September.
    2. Daniel R. Carroll & Ross Cohen-Kristiansen, 2020. "Why Are Headline PCE and Median PCE Inflations So Far Apart?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, vol. 2020(24), pages 1-6, October.

  4. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2019. "What Is Behind the Persistence of the Racial Wealth Gap?," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue February.

    Cited by:

    1. Alina K. Bartscher & Moritz Kuhn & Moritz Schularick & Paul Wachtel, 2021. "Monetary Policy and Racial Inequality," Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute Working Papers 45, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

  5. Dionissi Aliprantis & Daniel R. Carroll, 2018. "Neighborhood dynamics and the distribution of opportunity," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 9(1), pages 247-303, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Carroll, Daniel R. & Young, Eric R., 2018. "Neoclassical inequality," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 83-109.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Carroll, Daniel R. & Young, Eric R., 2011. "The long run effects of changes in tax progressivity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 1451-1473, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The Stationary Distribution of Wealth under Progressive Taxation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(3), pages 469-478, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Koyuncu, Murat, 2011. "Can progressive taxation account for cross-country variation in labor supply?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 1474-1488, September.
    2. Kazuo Mino & Yasuhiro Nakamoto, 2008. "Progressive Taxation, Wealth Distribution, and Macroeconomic Stability," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 08-22, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    3. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "The long run effects of changes in tax progressivity," Working Papers (Old Series) 0913, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    4. Manoj Atolia & Santanu Chatterjee & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2009. "Growth and Inequality: Dependence of the Time Path of Productivity Increases (and other Structural Changes)," Working Papers wp2009_01_02, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    5. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2014. "The Piketty Transition," Working Papers (Old Series) 1432, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    6. Wang, Wei & Suen, Richard M. H., 2015. "Diversity and Economic Growth in a Model with Progressive Taxation," MPRA Paper 67569, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Daniel R. Carroll, 2013. "The demand for income tax progressivity in the growth model," Working Papers (Old Series) 1106, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    8. Di Nola, Alessandro & Kocharkov, Georgi & Vasilev, Aleksandar, 2016. "Productivity, Taxation and Evasion: A Quantitative Exploration of the Determinants of the Informal Economy," EconStor Preprints 144164, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    9. Daniel R. Carroll & Eric R. Young, 2009. "A note on sunspots with heterogeneous agents," Working Papers (Old Series) 0906, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

Software components

    Sorry, no citations of software components recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 18 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (14) 2009-08-02 2010-02-05 2011-03-05 2012-06-13 2015-01-19 2016-03-06 2017-01-08 2019-04-01 2019-07-29 2019-09-30 2019-11-11 2019-11-11 2019-11-11 2020-07-20. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (10) 2015-01-09 2015-01-19 2017-01-08 2019-04-01 2019-05-13 2019-07-29 2019-11-11 2019-11-11 2019-11-11 2020-07-20. Author is listed
  3. NEP-INT: International Trade (5) 2019-04-01 2019-07-29 2019-09-30 2019-11-11 2020-07-20. Author is listed
  4. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (3) 2010-02-05 2015-01-09 2019-11-11
  5. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (3) 2010-02-05 2011-03-05 2019-11-11
  6. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (3) 2012-06-13 2018-07-16 2019-11-11
  7. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2012-06-13 2016-03-06
  8. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (2) 2018-07-16 2019-11-11
  9. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (2) 2019-11-11 2019-11-11
  10. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2015-01-19 2019-11-11
  11. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2015-01-19
  12. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2015-01-09
  13. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2019-11-11

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