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Jenny Säve-Söderbergh

Personal Details

First Name:Jenny
Middle Name:
Last Name:Säve-Söderbergh
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psv26
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www2.sofi.su.se/~jss/

Affiliation

Institutet för Social Forskning (SOFI)
Stockholms Universitet

Stockholm, Sweden
http://www.sofi.su.se/

: +46 (8) - 16 20 00
+46 (8) - 15 46 70
Universitetsvägen 10E, 106 91 Stockholm
RePEc:edi:sofsuse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Johan Almenberg & Jenny Säve-Söderbergh, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Sweden," CeRP Working Papers 112, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  2. Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2007. "Are Women Asking for Low Wages? Gender Differences in Wage Bargaining Strategies and Ensuing Bargaining Success," Working Paper Series 7/2007, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  3. Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella & Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2006. "Testing the rationality assumption using a design difference in the TV game show 'Jeopardy'," Working Paper Series 9/2006, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  4. Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2005. "Who is Willing to Let Ethics Guide His Economic Decision-Making? Evidence from Individual Investments in Ethical Funds," Working Paper Series 7/2005, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

Articles

  1. Lindquist, Gabriella Sjögren & Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2011. ""Girls will be Girls", especially among Boys: Risk-taking in the "Daily Double" on Jeopardy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 112(2), pages 158-160, August.
  2. Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2010. "Who lets ethics guide his economic decision-making? An empirical analysis of individual investments in ethical funds," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 270-272, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Johan Almenberg & Jenny Säve-Söderbergh, 2011. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Planning in Sweden," CeRP Working Papers 112, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).

    Cited by:

    1. Kaustia, Markku & Lehtoranta, Antti & Puttonen, Vesa, 2013. "Does sophistication affect long-term return expectations? Evidence from financial advisers' exam scores," SAFE Working Paper Series 3, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Alessie, Rob & Angelini, Viola & van Santen, Peter, 2013. "Pension wealth and household savings in Europe: Evidence from SHARELIFE," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 308-328.
    3. Zukarnain Zakaria & Siti Maisarah Mohamad Nor & Mohd Roslan Ismail, 2017. "Financial Literacy and Risk Tolerance towards Saving and Investment: A Case Study in Malaysia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(4), pages 507-514.
    4. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2014. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 5-44, March.
    5. Erika Pastoráková & Zuzana Brokešová & Jana Péliová, 2017. "Proaktívny prístup k tvorbe súkromných dôchodkových úspor: kľúčové determinanty
      [Proactive Approach to Private Pension Savings: Key Determinants]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2017(6), pages 709-727.
    6. Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Lusardi, Annamaria & Alessie, Rob J. M. & Van Rooij, Maarten C. J., 2014. "How Financially Literate are Women? An Overview and New Insights," MEA discussion paper series 201419, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    7. Barrett, Alan & Mosca, Irene & Whelan, Brendan J., 2013. "(Lack of) Pension Knowledge," IZA Discussion Papers 7596, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Ashok Thomas & Luca Spataro, 2015. "Financial Literacy, Human Capital and Stock Market Participation in Europe: An Empirical Exercise under Endogenous Framework," Discussion Papers 2015/194, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    9. Lereko Rasoaisi & Kalebe M. Kalebe, 2015. "Determinants of Financial Literacy among the National University of Lesotho Students," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(9), pages 1050-1060, September.
    10. Alessie, R.J.M. & Angelini, V. & van Santen, P.C., 2012. "Pension wealth and household savings in Europe," Research Report 12012-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    11. Luc Arrondel & Majdi Debbich & Frédérique Savignac, 2013. "Financial Literacy and Financial Planning in France," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-00859682, HAL.
    12. Spataro, Luca & Corsini, Lorenzo, 2013. "Endogenous financial literacy, saving and stock market participation," MPRA Paper 44342, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Zuzana Brokesova & Andrej Cupak & Gueorgui Kolev, 2017. "Financial literacy and voluntary savings for retirement in Slovakia," Working and Discussion Papers WP 10/2017, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
    14. Rayenda Khresna Brahmana & Ritzky Karina Brahmana, 2016. "The Financial Planning and Financial Literacy of ex-Malaysia Indonesian Migrant Workers," Acta Oeconomica Pragensia, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2016(5), pages 47-59.
    15. Enrique Marshall & Cristóbal Kaufmann, 2013. "Acceso de los Jóvenes a los Servicios Financieros: Realidades y Desafíos," Economic Policy Papers Central Bank of Chile 46, Central Bank of Chile.
    16. Luc Arrondel, 2018. "Financial Literacy and Asset Behaviour: Poor Education and Zero for Conduct?," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 60(1), pages 144-160, March.
    17. Brown, Martin & Graf, Roman, 2013. "Financial Literacy, Household Investment and Household Debt: Evidence from Switzerland," Working Papers on Finance 1301, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    18. Xu, Lisa & Zia, Bilal, 2012. "Financial literacy around the world : an overview of the evidence with practical suggestions for the way forward," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6107, The World Bank.
    19. Jelena Titko & Natalja Lace & Tatjana Polajeva, 2015. "Financial Issues Perceived By Youth: Preliminary Survey For Financial Literacy Evaluation In The Baltics," Oeconomia Copernicana, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 6(1), pages 75-98, March.
    20. Alfonso Arellano & Noelia Camara & David Tuesta, 2015. "Explaining the Gender Gap in Financial Literacy: the Role of Non-Cognitive Skills," Working Papers 15/32, BBVA Bank, Economic Research Department.
    21. Annamaria Lusardi, 2012. "Numeracy, financial literacy, and financial decision-making," NBER Working Papers 17821, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. M. Debbich, 2015. "Why Financial Advice Cannot Substitute for Financial Literacy?," Working papers 534, Banque de France.
    23. Monika Riedel & Helmut Hofer & Birgit Wögerbauer, 2015. "Determinants for the transition from work into retirement in Europe," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.

  2. Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2007. "Are Women Asking for Low Wages? Gender Differences in Wage Bargaining Strategies and Ensuing Bargaining Success," Working Paper Series 7/2007, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter, Noemi & Lundborg, Petter & Webbink, Dinand, 2015. "The Effect of a Sibling's Gender on Earnings, Education and Family Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 9128, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Articles

  1. Lindquist, Gabriella Sjögren & Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2011. ""Girls will be Girls", especially among Boys: Risk-taking in the "Daily Double" on Jeopardy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 112(2), pages 158-160, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicole Schneeweis & Martina Zweimüller, 2009. "Girls, girls, girls: gender composition and female school choice," Economics working papers 2009-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Brink, Siegrun & Kriwoluzky, Silke & Bijedic, Teita & Ettl, Kerstin & Welter, Friederike, 2014. "Gender, Innovation und Unternehmensentwicklung," IfM-Materialien 228, Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn.
    3. Julie A. Nelson, 2015. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse Than Men? A Re-Analysis Of The Literature Using Expanded Methods," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 566-585, July.
    4. Julie Nelson, 2015. "Fearing fear: gender and economic discourse," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 14(1), pages 129-139, June.
    5. Jetter, Michael & Walker, Jay K., 2017. "Gender Differences in Competitiveness and Risk-Taking among Children, Teenagers, and College Students: Evidence from Jeopardy!," IZA Discussion Papers 11201, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Jetter, Michael & Walker, Jay K., 2017. "Anchoring in financial decision-making: Evidence from Jeopardy!," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 164-176.
    7. Bernd Frick & Friedrich Scheel, 2013. "Gender differences in competitiveness: empirical evidence from 100m races," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports, chapter 14, pages 293-318 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Barasinska, Nataliya & Schäfer, Dorothea, 2013. "Is the willingness to take financial risk a sex-linked trait? Evidence from national surveys of household finance," Discussion Papers 05/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    9. Jenny Säve-Söderbergh & Gabriella Sjögren Lindquist, 2014. "Children Do Not Behave Like Adults: Gender Gaps in Performance and Risk Taking within a Random Social Context in the High-Stakes Game Shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy," CESifo Working Paper Series 4595, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Nataliya Barasinska & Dorothea Schäfer, 2013. "Financial risk taking, gender and social identity - Evidence from national surveys of household finance," LWS Working papers 15, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    11. Jetter, Michael & Walker, Jay K., 2016. "Gender in Jeopardy!: The Role of Opponent Gender in High-Stakes Competition," IZA Discussion Papers 9669, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Julie A. Nelson, 2012. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse than Men?," GDAE Working Papers 12-05, GDAE, Tufts University.
    13. Marco Castillo & Gregory Leo & Ragan Petrie, 2013. "Room Effects," Working Papers 1040, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science, revised Apr 2013.
    14. Julie A. Nelson, 2011. "11-03 "Would Women Leaders Have Prevented the Global Financial Crisis? Implications for Teaching about Gender, Behavior, and Economics"," GDAE Working Papers 11-03, GDAE, Tufts University.

  2. Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2010. "Who lets ethics guide his economic decision-making? An empirical analysis of individual investments in ethical funds," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 270-272, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Mohamed A. Ayadi & Hatem Ben-Ameur & Lawrence Kryzanowski, 2016. "Typical and Tail Performance of Canadian Equity SRI Mutual Funds," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 50(1), pages 57-94, August.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (2) 2007-01-13 2007-06-23
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2007-06-23 2011-04-16
  3. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2011-04-16
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2007-06-23
  5. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2007-06-23
  6. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2011-04-16
  7. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2007-01-13
  8. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2005-12-09

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