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Financial Literacy and Financial Planning in France


  • Arrondel, L.
  • Debbich, M.
  • Savignac, F.


How are people financially literate in France? We address this question using the PATER survey and following the Lusardi and Mitchell (2011c) approach. We find that some subpopulations are less financially literate than others: women, young and old people as well as less-educated people are more likely to face difficulties when dealing with fundamental financial concepts such as risk diversification, inflation and interest compounding. We also find some differences in financial knowledge depending on the political opinion of the respondents. Finally we show that these differences in financial knowledge are correlated with differences in the propensity to plan: people who score higher on the financial literacy questions are more likely to be engaged in the preparation of a clearly defined financial plan.

Suggested Citation

  • Arrondel, L. & Debbich, M. & Savignac, F., 2013. "Financial Literacy and Financial Planning in France," Working papers 465, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:465

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mervyn A. King & Jonathan I. Leape, 1987. "Asset Accumulation, Information, and the Life Cycle," NBER Working Papers 2392, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rob J. Alessie & Maarten van Rooij & Annamaria Lusardi, 2011. "Financial Literacy, Retirement Preparation and Pension Expectations in the Netherlands," NBER Working Papers 17109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    4. Jappelli, Tullio & Padula, Mario, 2013. "Investment in financial literacy and saving decisions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2779-2792.
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    10. Alessie, Rob & Van Rooij, Maarten & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2011. "Financial literacy and retirement preparation in the Netherlands," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 527-545, October.
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    14. Fornero, Elsa & Monticone, Chiara, 2011. "Financial literacy and pension plan participation in Italy," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 547-564, October.
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    17. Laibson, David I. & Agarwal, Sumit & Driscoll, John C. & Gabaix, Xavier, 2009. "The Age of Reason: Financial Decisions over the Life-Cycle with Implications for Regulation," Scholarly Articles 4554335, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Lamla, Bettina, 2014. "The long Shadow of Socialism: On East-West German Differences in Financial Literacy," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100585, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Jeffrey R. Brown & Arie Kapteyn & Erzo F.P. Luttmer & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2017. "Cognitive Constraints on Valuing Annuities," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 429-462.
    3. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2014. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 5-44, March.
    4. F. Borel-Mathurin & P.-E. Darpeix & Q. Guibert & S. Loisel, 2015. "Main determinants of profit sharing policy in the French life insurance industry," Débats économiques et financiers 17, Banque de France.
    5. repec:spr:jbecon:v:87:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11573-017-0853-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Agarwal, Sumit & Amromin, Gene & Ben-David, Itzhak & Chomsisengphet, Souphala & Evanoff, Douglas D., 2015. "Financial literacy and financial planning: Evidence from India," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 4-21.
    7. M. Debbich, 2015. "Why Financial Advice Cannot Substitute for Financial Literacy?," Working papers 534, Banque de France.
    8. repec:mea:meawpa:14282 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Laura Hospido & Ernesto Villanueva & Gema Zamarro, 2015. "Finance For All: The Impact Of Financial Literacy Training In Compulsory Secondary Education In Spain," Working Papers 1502, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    10. Arus Kongrungchok, 2016. "The Effectiveness of Personal Financial Planning of Rubber Farmers in Thailand: Case Study of Suratthani Province," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 4106729, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    11. repec:bla:jconsa:v:51:y:2017:i:2:p:255-283 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Annamaria Lusardi & Rob Alessie & Maarten van Rooij, 2017. "How Financially Literate Are Women? An Overview and New Insights," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 255-283, July.
    13. Zuzana Brokesova & Andrej Cupak & Gueorgui Kolev, 2017. "Financial literacy and voluntary savings for retirement in Slovakia," Working and Discussion Papers WP 10/2017, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
    14. Bajo Emanuele & Barbi Massimiliano & Sandri Sandro, 2015. "Financial Literacy, Households' Investment Behavior, and Risk Propensity," Journal of Financial Management, Markets and Institutions, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 157-174, June.

    More about this item


    Financial Literacy; Retirement Planning; Household Finance.;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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